f.haeder.net

Search

Items tagged with: public

Slack files to goes public via direct listing on NYSE


#direct #files #goes #listing #nyse #public #slack #via
 

Les serres royales de Laeken ouvrent leurs portes au public


Image/photo

#breakingnews #laeken #les #leurs #news #ouvrent #portes #public #royales #serres

Situées dans le parc de la résidence royale de Belgique, ces serres ont été construites sous le règne de Léopold II, entre 1865 et 1909. On y trouve des milliers de plantes tropicales.Image/photo
posted by pod_feeder
 

Everyone’s Income Taxes Should Be Public


Disclosure of tax payments would make it easier to hold politicians accountable. It also would help to reduce fraud and economic inequality.
Article word count: 890

HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19658638
Posted by pseudolus (karma: 18027)
Post stats: Points: 77 - Comments: 141 - 2019-04-14T11:03:28Z

#HackerNews #everyones #income #public #should #taxes
Article content:




Disclosure of tax payments would make it easier to hold politicians accountable. It also would help to reduce fraud and economic inequality.

Image
CreditCreditAdam McCauley

In October 1924, the federal government threw open for public inspection the files that recorded the incomes of American taxpayers, and the amounts they had paid in taxes.

Americans were gripped by a fever of interest in the finances of their neighbors. This newspaper devoted a large chunk of the front page to a list of the top taxpayers in Manhattan under a banner headline that read “[1]J.D. Rockefeller Jr. Paid $7,435,169.” One story reported that a number of wives and ex-wives had lined up at a government office in New York to seek information about their present or former husbands. Journalists soon began to note the curious absence of some conspicuously wealthy people from the lists of top taxpayers.

Congress had ordered the disclosure as a weapon against tax fraud. “Secrecy is of the greatest aid to corruption,” [2]said Senator Robert Howell of Nebraska. “The price of liberty is not only eternal vigilance, but also publicity.”

There is every reason to think that sunlight served the desired purpose. One important piece of evidence is that wealthy Americans absolutely hated the disclosure law, and soon persuaded Congress to execute a U-turn.

Almost a century later, it’s time to revisit the merits of universal public disclosure. Democrats in Congress are fighting to obtain President Trump’s tax returns under a separate 1924 law, written in response to related concerns about public corruption. That issue could be resolved, at least in part, if Congress embraced the broader case for publishing everyone’s tax bill.

Now as then, disclosure could help to ensure that people pay a fair share of taxes. Americans underpay their taxes by [3]more than [4]$450 [5]billion each year, more than 10 percent of total federal revenue. Publishing a list of millionaires who paid little or no taxes this year could significantly reduce the number of millionaires who pay little or no taxes next year.

In Norway, where tax records have been public since the founding of the modern state in 1814, a newspaper put the records online in 2001. [6]One study estimated that the records’ greater availability caused a 3.1 percent increase in the reported incomes of self-employed Norwegians over the next three years, perhaps because they feared exposure.

Disclosure also could help to reduce disparities in income, as well as disparities in tax payments. Inequality is easier to ignore in the absence of evidence. In Finland, where tax data is published each year on Nov. 1 — [7]jovially known as National Jealousy Day — people treat the information as a barometer of whether inequality is yawning too wide.

Consider that public corporations are required to report the compensation of top executives — who check disclosures of rival companies to ensure they are not underpaid.

Another benefit would be identifying patterns of illegal discrimination against women or minorities. Lilly Ledbetter, for whom the [8]2009 fair pay law is named, would have learned a lot sooner that she was making less than her male colleagues at a Goodyear plant in Alabama if she could have looked up their annual incomes on a government website.

Transparency could even help to increase economic growth. People who know how much their co-workers are paid — and how much people are paid at other companies, and in other industries — can make better career decisions.

Tax data also is a rich source of information about American life. The I.R.S. tightly limits access, but one of the few researchers allowed to work with that data, [9]the Harvard economist Raj Chetty, has produced a series of important studies illuminating the mechanics of economic inequality. He and his collaborators have shown that Americans have [10]a dwindling chance of making more money than their parents, and that living in a good neighborhood as a child [11]has a lifelong impact on earnings. One can only imagine what others might learn from the data.

Calling for more disclosure may seem discordant at a time of growing concern about privacy. But income taxation is an act of government, not an aspect of private life. Property tax records provide a reasonable model. Local governments disclose the name of the property owner, the value of the property and the amount of taxes owed and paid. The same information should be available for income taxes — nothing more is necessary.

Another reasonable rule: In Norway, it is a matter of public record when someone looks at tax records. Everyone can see who is nosing around. Wisconsin, which makes income and tax information available on request, [12]imposes the same requirement.

Income taxation in the United States began in public view. When Congress imposed the first income tax in 1861, during the Civil War, it required the disclosure of names, incomes and tax payments. Over the following decade, before Congress ended the tax, this data was posted in public and printed in newspapers.

That practice was briefly revived in 1924. It’s time for another revival. The question is whether Americans are willing to endure a little sunlight in the interest of fairness and equality.

Binyamin Appelbaum joined the Times editorial board in 2019. From 2010 to 2019, he was a Washington correspondent for The Times, covering the Federal Reserve and other aspects of economic policy. He has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in public service. [13]@BCAppelbaum • [14]Facebook

References

Visible links
1. https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1924/10/24/issue.html
2. https://www.ntanet.org/NTJ/56/4/ntj-v56n04p803-30-public-disclosure-corporate-tax.pdf
3. https://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-18-39
4. https://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-18-39
5. https://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-18-39
6. https://www.ssb.no/en/forskning/discussion-papers/_attachment/161120?_ts=143e822ee80
7. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/01/world/europe/finland-national-jealousy-day.html?module=inline
8. https://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/30/us/politics/30ledbetter-web.html?module=inline
9. https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2014/05/how-two-economists-got-direct-access-irs-tax-records
10. https://opportunityinsights.org/national_trends/
11. https://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/04/upshot/an-atlas-of-upward-mobility-shows-paths-out-of-poverty.html?module=inline
12. https://docs.legis.wisconsin.gov/statutes/statutes/71/XII/78/2
13. https://twitter.com/BCAppelbaum
14. https://www.facebook.com/binyamin.appelbaum

HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 98 - Loop: 157 - Rank min: 80 - Author rank: 78

The New York Times: Opinion | Everyone’s Income Taxes Should Be Public (By BINYAMIN APPELBAUM)

 

Public Sans – A strong, neutral typeface for text or display


A strong, neutral typeface for text or display.
Article word count: 8

HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19607371
Posted by thinkalone (karma: 328)
Post stats: Points: 249 - Comments: 70 - 2019-04-08T17:45:52Z

#HackerNews #display #for #neutral #public #sans #strong #text #typeface
Article content:

A strong, neutral typeface for text or display.

HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 189 - Loop: 86 - Rank min: 100 - Author rank: 29
 

Rise of Candida auris embodies a serious and growing public health threat


The rise of Candida auris embodies a serious and growing public health threat: drug-resistant germs.
Article word count: 4209

HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19590180
Posted by pseudolus (karma: 16878)
Post stats: Points: 252 - Comments: 62 - 2019-04-06T10:51:30Z

#HackerNews #and #auris #candida #embodies #growing #health #public #rise #serious #threat
Article content:




Deadly germs, Lost cures

The rise of Candida auris embodies a serious and growing public health threat: drug-resistant germs.

Bacteria are rebelling. They’re turning the tide against antibiotics by outsmarting our wonder drugs. This video explores the surprising reasons.CreditCreditMelissa Golden for The New York Times

By [1]Matt Richtel and [2]Andrew Jacobs

Last May, an elderly man was admitted to the Brooklyn branch of Mount Sinai Hospital for abdominal surgery. A blood test revealed that he was infected with a newly discovered germ as deadly as it was mysterious. Doctors swiftly isolated him in the intensive care unit.

The germ, a fungus called Candida auris, preys on people with weakened immune systems, and it is quietly spreading across the globe. Over the last five years, it has hit a neonatal unit in Venezuela, [3]swept through a hospital in Spain, forced a prestigious British medical center to shut down its intensive care unit, and taken root in India, Pakistan and [4]South Africa.

Recently C. auris reached [5]New York, [6]New Jersey and Illinois, leading the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to add it to a list of germs deemed “urgent threats.”

[[7]Like the Science Times page on Facebook. | Sign up for the [8]Science Times newsletter.]

The man at Mount Sinai died after 90 days in the hospital, but C. auris did not. Tests showed it was everywhere in his room, so invasive that the hospital needed special cleaning equipment and had to rip out some of the ceiling and floor tiles to eradicate it.

“Everything was positive — the walls, the bed, the doors, the curtains, the phones, the sink, the whiteboard, the poles, the pump,” said Dr. Scott Lorin, the hospital’s president. “The mattress, the bed rails, the canister holes, the window shades, the ceiling, everything in the room was positive.”

C. auris is so tenacious, in part, because it is impervious to major antifungal medications, making it a new example of one of the world’s most intractable health threats: the rise of drug-resistant infections.

Image
Dr. Shawn Lockhart, a fungal disease expert at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, holding a microscope slide with inactive Candida auris collected from an American patient.CreditMelissa Golden for The New York Times

For decades, public health experts have warned that the overuse of antibiotics was reducing the effectiveness of drugs that have lengthened life spans by curing bacterial infections once commonly fatal. But lately, there has been an explosion of resistant fungi as well, adding a new and frightening dimension to a phenomenon that is undermining a pillar of modern medicine.

“It’s an enormous problem,” said Matthew Fisher, a professor of fungal epidemiology at Imperial College London, who was a co-author of [9]a recent scientific review on the rise of resistant fungi. “We depend on being able to treat those patients with antifungals.”

Simply put, fungi, just like bacteria, are evolving defenses to survive modern medicines.

Yet even as world health leaders have pleaded for more restraint in prescribing antimicrobial drugs to combat bacteria and fungi — convening the United Nations General Assembly in 2016 to manage an emerging crisis — gluttonous overuse of them in hospitals, clinics and farming has continued.

Resistant germs are often called “superbugs,” but this is simplistic because they don’t typically kill everyone. Instead, they are most lethal to people with immature or compromised immune systems, including newborns and the elderly, smokers, diabetics and people with autoimmune disorders who take steroids that suppress the body’s defenses.

Scientists say that unless more effective new medicines are developed and unnecessary use of antimicrobial drugs is sharply curbed, risk will spread to healthier populations. A study the British government funded [10]projects that if policies are not put in place to slow the rise of drug resistance, 10 million people could die worldwide of all such infections in 2050, eclipsing the eight million expected to die that year from cancer.

Dr. Johanna Rhodes, an infectious disease expert at Imperial College London. "We are driving this with the use of antifungicides on crops," she said of drug-resistant germs.CreditTom Jamieson for The New York Times

In the United States, two million people contract resistant infections annually, and 23,000 die from them, according to the official C.D.C. estimate. That number was based on 2010 figures; more recent estimates [11]from researchers at Washington University School of Medicine put the death toll at 162,000. Worldwide fatalities from resistant infections are [12]estimated at 700,000.

Antibiotics and antifungals are both essential to combat infections in people, but antibiotics are also used widely to prevent disease in farm animals, and antifungals are also applied to prevent agricultural plants from rotting. Some scientists cite evidence that rampant use of fungicides on crops is contributing to the surge in drug-resistant fungi infecting humans.

Yet as the problem grows, it is little understood by the public — in part because the very existence of resistant infections is often cloaked in secrecy.

With bacteria and fungi alike, hospitals and local governments are reluctant to disclose outbreaks for fear of being seen as infection hubs. Even the C.D.C., under its agreement with states, is not allowed to make public the location or name of hospitals involved in outbreaks. State governments have in many cases declined to publicly share information beyond acknowledging that they have had cases.

All the while, the germs are easily spread — carried on hands and equipment inside hospitals; ferried on meat and manure-fertilized vegetables from farms; transported across borders by travelers and on exports and imports; and transferred by patients from nursing home to hospital and back.

C. auris, which infected the man at Mount Sinai, is one of [13]dozens of dangerous bacteria and fungi that have developed resistance.

A projection of the C. auris fungus on a microscope slide.CreditMelissa Golden for The New York Times

Other prominent strains of the fungus Candida — one of the most common causes of bloodstream infections in hospitals — have not developed significant resistance to drugs, but more than 90 percent of C. auris infections are resistant to at least one drug, and 30 percent are resistant to two or more drugs, the C.D.C. said.

Dr. Lynn Sosa, Connecticut’s deputy state epidemiologist, said she now saw C. auris as “the top” threat among resistant infections. “It’s pretty much unbeatable and difficult to identify,” she said.

Nearly half of patients who contract C. auris die within 90 days, according to the C.D.C. Yet the world’s experts have not nailed down where it came from in the first place.

“It is a creature from the black lagoon,” said Dr. Tom Chiller, who heads the fungal branch at the C.D.C., which is spearheading a global detective effort to find treatments and stop the spread. “It bubbled up and now it is everywhere.”

A deadly, drug-resistant fungus is infecting patients in hospitals and nursing homes around the world. The fungus seems to have emerged in several locations at once, not from a single source.

EUROPE

The first large outbreak in Europe involved 72 cases in a London hospital in 2015–16.

Multiple cases of

Candida auris infection

UNITED STATES

The country has had at least 587 Candida auris infections since 2013.

INDIA AND PAKISTAN

The two countries have some of the highest case counts in the world. A distinct strain appeared in Pakistan as early as 2008 and in Delhi by 2009.

CENTRAL AND

SOUTH AMERICA

The first documented outbreak in the Americas was from 2012–13 at a medical center in Venezuela. Five of 18 infected patients died.

SOUTH AFRICA

A genetically distinct strain of Candida auris in South Africa infected at least 451 patients from 2012–16.

JAPAN

Candida auris (left) was discovered in 2009 in the infected ear of a 70-year-old Japanese woman.

EUROPE

The first large outbreak in Europe involved 72 cases in a London hospital in 2015–16.

Multiple cases of

Candida auris infection

UNITED STATES

The country has had at least 587 Candida auris infections since 2013.

CENTRAL AND

SOUTH AMERICA

The first documented outbreak in the Americas was from 2012–13 at a medical center in Venezuela. Five of 18 infected patients died.

INDIA AND PAKISTAN

The two countries have some of the highest case counts in the world. A distinct strain appeared in Pakistan as early as 2008 and in Delhi by 2009.

SOUTH AFRICA

A genetically distinct strain of Candida auris in South Africa infected at least 451 patients from 2012–16.

JAPAN

Candida auris (left) was discovered in 2009 in the infected ear of a 70-year-old Japanese woman.

Multiple cases of

Candida auris infection

EUROPE

The first large outbreak in Europe involved 72 cases in a London hospital in 2015–16.

UNITED STATES

The country has had at least 587 Candida auris infections since 2013.

INDIA AND PAKISTAN

The two countries have some of the highest case counts in the world. A distinct strain appeared in Pakistan as early as 2008 and in Delhi by 2009.

CENTRAL AND

SOUTH AMERICA

The first documented outbreak in the Americas was from 2012–13 at a medical center in Venezuela. Five of 18 infected patients died.

SOUTH AFRICA

A genetically distinct strain of Candida auris in South Africa infected at least 451 patients from 2012–16.

JAPAN

Candida auris (left) was discovered in 2009 in the infected ear of a 70-year-old Japanese woman.

Multiple cases of

Candida auris infection

UNITED STATES

The country has had at least 587 Candida auris infections since 2013.

EUROPE

The first large outbreak in Europe involved 72 cases in a London hospital in 2015–16.

CENTRAL AND

SOUTH AMERICA

The first documented outbreak in the Americas was from 2012–13 at a medical center in Venezuela. Five of 18 infected patients died.

SOUTH AFRICA

A genetically distinct strain of Candida auris in South Africa infected at least 451 patients from 2012–16.

INDIA AND PAKISTAN

The two countries have some of the highest case counts in the world. A distinct strain appeared in Pakistan as early as 2008 and in Delhi by 2009.

CHINA

A study of a Shenyang hospital found 15 samples from 2011–17 that were misidentified as a different strain of fungus. Candida auris is hard to identify and may unreported in other hospitals around the world.

JAPAN

Candida auris was discovered in 2009 in the infected ear of a 70-year-old Japanese woman.

Multiple cases of

Candida auris infection

UNITED STATES

The country has had at least 587 Candida auris infections since 2013.

CENTRAL AND

SOUTH AMERICA

The first documented outbreak in the Americas was from 2012–13 at a medical center in Venezuela. Five of 18 infected patients died.

EUROPE

The first large outbreak in Europe involved 72 cases in a London hospital in 2015–16.

SOUTH AFRICA

A genetically distinct strain of Candida auris in South Africa infected at least 451 patients from 2012–16.

INDIA AND PAKISTAN

The two countries have some of the highest case counts in the world. A distinct strain appeared in Pakistan as early as 2008 and in Delhi by 2009.

JAPAN

Candida auris was discovered in 2009 in the infected ear of a 70-year-old Japanese woman.

Multiple cases of

Candida auris

infection

UNITED STATES

The country has had at least 587 Candida auris infections since 2013.

CENTRAL AND

SOUTH AMERICA

The first documented outbreak in the Americas was at a medical center in Venezuela from 2012–13.

EUROPE

The first large outbreak in Europe involved 72 cases in a London hospital in 2015–16.

SOUTH AFRICA

A genetically distinct strain of Candida auris in South Africa infected at least 451 patients from 2012–16.

INDIA AND PAKISTAN

The two countries have some of the highest case counts in the world.

JAPAN

Candida auris was discovered in 2009 in the infected ear of a 70-year-old Japanese woman.

By The New York Times | Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Emerging Infectious Diseases; Emerging Microbes & Infections; Clinical Infectious Diseases; Journal of Infection; Mycoses; Doherty Institute. Image from Kazuo Satoh et al., Microbiology and Immunology

In late 2015, Dr. Johanna Rhodes, an infectious disease expert at Imperial College London, got a panicked call from the Royal Brompton Hospital, a British medical center outside London. C. auris had taken root there months earlier, and the hospital couldn’t clear it.

“‘We have no idea where it’s coming from. We’ve never heard of it. It’s just spread like wildfire,’” Dr. Rhodes said she was told. She agreed to help the hospital identify the fungus’s genetic profile and clean it from rooms.

Under her direction, hospital workers used a special device to spray aerosolized hydrogen peroxide around a room used for a patient with C. auris, the theory being that the vapor would scour each nook and cranny. They left the device going for a week. Then they put a “settle plate” in the middle of the room with a gel at the bottom that would serve as a place for any surviving microbes to grow, Dr. Rhodes said.

Only one organism grew back. C. auris.

It was spreading, but word of it was not. The hospital, a specialty lung and heart center that draws wealthy patients from the Middle East and around Europe, alerted the British government and told infected patients, but made no public announcement.

“There was no need to put out a news release during the outbreak,” said Oliver Wilkinson, a spokesman for the hospital.

This hushed panic is playing out in hospitals around the world. Individual institutions and national, state and local governments have been reluctant to publicize outbreaks of resistant infections, arguing there is no point in scaring patients — or prospective ones.

"Somehow, it made a jump almost seemingly simultaneously, and seemed to spread and it is drug resistant, which is really mind-boggling," said Dr. Snigdha Vallabhaneni, a fungal expert and epidemiologist at the C.D.C.CreditMelissa Golden for The New York Times

Dr. Silke Schelenz, Royal Brompton’s infectious disease specialist, found the lack of urgency from the government and hospital in the early stages of the outbreak “very, very frustrating.”

“They obviously didn’t want to lose reputation,” Dr. Schelenz said. “It hadn’t impacted our surgical outcomes.”

By the end of June 2016, a scientific paper [14]reported “an ongoing outbreak of 50 C. auris cases” at Royal Brompton, and the hospital took an extraordinary step: It shut down its I.C.U. for 11 days, moving intensive care patients to another floor, again with no announcement.

Days later the hospital finally acknowledged to a newspaper that it had a problem. A [15]headline in The Daily Telegraph warned, “Intensive Care Unit Closed After Deadly New Superbug Emerges in the U.K.” (Later research said there were eventually 72 total cases, though some patients were only carriers and were not infected by the fungus.)

Yet the issue remained little known internationally, while an even bigger outbreak had begun in Valencia, Spain, at the 992-bed Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe. There, unbeknown to the public or unaffected patients, 372 people were colonized — meaning they had the germ on their body but were not sick with it — and 85 developed bloodstream infections. A [16]paper in the journal Mycoses reported that 41 percent of the infected patients died within 30 days.

A statement from the hospital said it was not necessarily C. auris that killed them. “It is very difficult to discern whether patients die from the pathogen or with it, since they are patients with many underlying diseases and in very serious general condition,” the statement said.

As with Royal Brompton, the hospital in Spain did not make any public announcement. It still has not.

One author of the article in Mycoses, a doctor at the hospital, said in an email that the hospital did not want him to speak to journalists because it “is concerned about the public image of the hospital.”

The secrecy infuriates patient advocates, who say people have a right to know if there is an outbreak so they can decide whether to go to a hospital, particularly when dealing with a nonurgent matter, like elective surgery.

Outside the Royal Brompton Hospital near London. By June 2016, the hospital had seen at least 50 “proven or possible” cases of C. auris, and decided to shut down its intensive care unit for 11 days to address the contamination.CreditTom Jamieson for The New York Times

“Why the heck are we reading about an outbreak almost a year and a half later — and not have it front-page news the day after it happens?” said Dr. Kevin Kavanagh, a physician in Kentucky and [17]board chairman of Health Watch USA, a nonprofit patient advocacy group. “You wouldn’t tolerate this at a restaurant with a food poisoning outbreak.”

Health officials say that disclosing outbreaks frightens patients about a situation they can do nothing about, particularly when the risks are unclear.

“It’s hard enough with these organisms for health care providers to wrap their heads around it,” said Dr. Anna Yaffee, a former C.D.C. outbreak investigator who dealt with resistant infection outbreaks in Kentucky in which the hospitals were not publicly disclosed. “It’s really impossible to message to the public.”

Officials in London did alert the C.D.C. to the Royal Brompton outbreak while it was occurring. And the C.D.C. realized it needed to get the word to American hospitals. On June 24, 2016, the C.D.C. blasted a nationwide warning to hospitals and medical groups and set up an email address, [18]candidaauris@cdc.gov, to field queries. Dr. Snigdha Vallabhaneni, a key member of the fungal team, expected to get a trickle — “maybe a message every month.”

Instead, within weeks, her inbox exploded.

In the United States, 587 cases of people having contracted C. auris have been reported, concentrated with 309 in New York, 104 in New Jersey and 144 in Illinois, according to the C.D.C.

The symptoms — fever, aches and fatigue — are seemingly ordinary, but when a person gets infected, particularly someone already unhealthy, such commonplace symptoms can be fatal.

The earliest known case in the United States involved a woman who arrived at a New York hospital on May 6, 2013, seeking care for respiratory failure. She was 61 and from the United Arab Emirates, and she died a week later, after testing positive for the fungus. At the time, the hospital hadn’t thought much of it, but three years later, it sent the case to the C.D.C. after reading the agency’s June 2016 advisory.

Most cases in the United States have been in nursing homes in New York City, Chicago and New Jersey.

Confirmed and

probable cases,

2013–19

Confirmed and

probable cases,

2013–19

Confirmed and probable cases, 2013–19

By The New York Times | Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

This woman probably was not America’s first C. auris patient. She carried a strain different from the South Asian one most common here. It killed a 56-year-old American woman who had traveled to India in March 2017 for elective abdominal surgery, contracted C. auris and was airlifted back to a hospital in Connecticut that officials will not identify. She was later transferred to a Texas hospital, where she died.

The germ has spread into long-term care facilities. In Chicago, 50 percent of the residents at some nursing homes have tested positive for it, the C.D.C. has reported. The fungus can grow on intravenous lines and ventilators.

Workers who care for patients infected with C. auris worry for their own safety. Dr. Matthew McCarthy, who has treated several C. auris patients at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York, described experiencing an unusual fear when treating a 30-year-old man.

“I found myself not wanting to touch the guy,” he said. “I didn’t want to take it from the guy and bring it to someone else.” He did his job and thoroughly examined the patient, but said, “There was an overwhelming feeling of being terrified of accidentally picking it up on a sock or tie or gown.”

Dr. Tom Chiller, head of the fungal branch at the C.D.C. “It is a creature from the black lagoon,” he said of C. auris.CreditMelissa Golden for The New York Times

As the C.D.C. works to limit the spread of drug-resistant C. auris, its investigators have been trying to answer the vexing question: Where in the world did it come from?

The first time doctors encountered C. auris was [19]in the ear of a woman in Japan in 2009 (auris is Latin for ear). It seemed innocuous at the time, a cousin of common, easily treated fungal infections.

Three years later, it appeared in an unusual test result in the lab of [20]Dr. Jacques Meis, a microbiologist in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, who was analyzing a bloodstream infection in 18 patients from four hospitals in India. Soon, new clusters of C. auris seemed to emerge with each passing month in different parts of the world.

The C.D.C. investigators theorized that C. auris started in Asia and spread across the globe. But when the agency compared the entire genome of auris samples from India and Pakistan, Venezuela, South Africa and Japan, it found that its origin was not a single place, and there was not a single auris strain.

The C.D.C. in miniature. In the United States, two million people contract resistant infections each year, and 23,000 die from them, according to the official C.D.C. estimate.CreditMelissa Golden for The New York Times

The genome sequencing showed that there were four distinctive versions of the fungus, with differences so profound that they suggested that these strains had diverged thousands of years ago and emerged as resistant pathogens from harmless environmental strains in four different places at the same time.

“Somehow, it made a jump almost seemingly simultaneously, and seemed to spread and it is drug resistant, which is really mind-boggling,” Dr. Vallabhaneni said.

There are different theories as to what happened with C. auris. Dr. Meis, the Dutch researcher, said he believed that drug-resistant fungi were developing thanks to heavy use of fungicides on crops.

Dr. Meis became intrigued by resistant fungi when he heard about the case of a 63-year-old patient in the Netherlands who died in 2005 from a fungus called Aspergillus. It proved resistant to a front-line antifungal treatment called itraconazole. That drug is a virtual copy of the azole pesticides that are used to dust crops the world over and account for more than [21]one-third of all fungicide sales.

A 2013 [22]paper in Plos Pathogens said that it appeared to be no coincidence that drug-resistant Aspergillus was showing up in the environment where the azole fungicides were used. The fungus appeared in 12 percent of Dutch soil samples, for example, but also in “flower beds, compost, leaves, plant seeds, soil samples of tea gardens, paddy fields, hospital surroundings, and aerial samples of hospitals.”

Dr. Meis visited the C.D.C. last summer to share research and theorize that the same thing is happening with C. auris, which is also found in the soil: Azoles have created an environment so hostile that the fungi are evolving, with resistant strains surviving.

This is similar to concerns that resistant bacteria are growing because of excessive use of antibiotics in livestock for health and growth promotion. As with antibiotics in farm animals, azoles are used widely on crops.

“On everything — potatoes, beans, wheat, anything you can think of, tomatoes, onions,” said Dr. Rhodes, the infectious disease specialist who worked on the London outbreak. “We are driving this with the use of antifungicides on crops.”

Dr. Chiller theorizes that C. auris may have benefited from the heavy use of fungicides. His idea is that C. auris actually has existed for thousands of years, hidden in the world’s crevices, a not particularly aggressive bug. But as azoles began destroying more prevalent fungi, an opportunity arrived for C. auris to enter the breach, a germ that had the ability to readily resist fungicides now suitable for a world in which fungi less able to resist are under attack.

The mystery of C. auris’s emergence remains unsolved, and its origin seems, for the moment, to be less important than stopping its spread.

An empty hospital bed at Mount Sinai.CreditHilary Swift for The New York Times

For now, the uncertainty around C. auris has led to a climate of fear, and sometimes denial.

Last spring, Jasmine Cutler, 29, went to visit her 72-year-old father at a hospital in New York City, where he had been admitted because of complications from a surgery the previous month.

When she arrived at his room, she discovered that he had been sitting for at least an hour in a recliner, in his own feces, because no one had come when he had called for help to use the bathroom. Ms. Cutler said it became clear to her that the staff was afraid to touch him because a test had shown that he was carrying C. auris.

“I saw doctors and nurses looking in the window of his room,” she said. “My father’s not a guinea pig. You’re not going to treat him like a freak at a show.”

He was eventually discharged and told he no longer carried the fungus. But he declined to be named, saying he feared being associated with the frightening infection.

Matt Richtel is a best-selling author and Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter based in San Francisco. He joined The Times staff in 2000, and his work has focused on science, technology, business and narrative-driven storytelling around these issues.

[23]@mrichtel

Andrew Jacobs is a reporter with the Health and Science Desk, based in New York. He previously reported from Beijing and Brazil and had stints as a Metro reporter, Styles writer and National correspondent, covering the American South. [24]@AndrewJacobsNYT

A version of this article appears in print on , on Page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Fungus Immune to Drugs Quietly Sweeps the Globe. [25]Order Reprints | [26]Today’s Paper | [27]Subscribe

References

Visible links
1. https://www.nytimes.com/by/matt-richtel
2. https://www.nytimes.com/by/andrew-jacobs
3. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/myc.12781
4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4073876/
5. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/24/10/18-0649_article#tnF2
6. https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/candida-auris/tracking-c-auris.html
7. http://on.fb.me/1paTQ1h
8. http://nyti.ms/1MbHaRU
9. http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6390/739
10. https://amr-review.org/
11. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/infection-control-and-hospital-epidemiology/article/reestimating-annual-deaths-due-to-multidrugresistant-organism-infections/C9B09A787FCCA1EA992AF45066F3FF7C
12. https://amr-review.org/
13. https://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/biggest_threats.html
14. https://aricjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13756-016-0132-5
15. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/07/08/intensive-care-unit-closed-as-three-people-die-from-new-superbug/
16. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/myc.12781
17. http://www.healthwatchusa.org/HWUSA-Officers/bios/_Kavanagh.htm
18. mailto:candidaauris@cdc.gov
19. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19161556
20. https://www.ecmm.info/fecmm/fellows/meis-jacques/
21. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3812019/
22. https://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1003633
23. https://twitter.com/mrichtel
24. https://twitter.com/AndrewJacobsNYT
25. http://www.nytreprints.com/
26. http://www.nytimes.com/pages/todayspaper/index.html
27. https://www.nytimes.com/subscriptions/Multiproduct/lp8HYKU.html?campaignId=48JQY

HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 188 - Loop: 467 - Rank min: 100 - Author rank: 77

The New York Times: A Mysterious Infection, Spanning the Globe in a Climate of Secrecy (By MATT RICHTEL and ANDREW JACOBS)

 

Democrats have a secret DMV for themselves & cronies

‘Secret’ #DMV office serving #California lawmakers would be closed under #GOP proposal





It’s all but impossible to find for those who don’t know what they’re looking for.

#Room-121 rests at the end of an #isolated #hallway across the street from the #Capitol, is locked at all times and has no signage whatsoever. The only indicator of its existence is a peephole outside the front door.

The #special #Department-of-Motor-Vehicles #office is closed to the #public, and if one #Republican gets his way, it will be #closed to the #lawmakers and Capitol staff members using it.

“There’s a #secret #DMV across from the state Capitol with streamlined service that’s only #available to #members of the #Legislature and a select group of #political #insiders,” said Republican #Assemblyman #KevinKiley of #GraniteBay. “This is supposed to be a #government of the #people, by the people and for the people, not an #oligarchy where a #gilded #political-class enjoys #privileges that aren’t available to the people that we represent.”

https://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article228840304.html
 

Using a Yubikey as smartcard for SSH public key authentication


Contributed by Paul 'WEiRD' de Weerd on 2019-03-21 from the shire lease dept. Ken Westerback (krw@) writes in with his report from a2k19, the hackathon in New Zealand: Due to an earlier (pre-737Max)…
Article word count: 128

HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19566126
Posted by sverige (karma: 4874)
Post stats: Points: 117 - Comments: 39 - 2019-04-03T18:56:11Z

#HackerNews #authentication #for #key #public #smartcard #ssh #using #yubikey
Article content:

Contributed by [1]Paul ʼWEiRDʼ de Weerd on 2019-03-21 from the shire lease dept.

Ken Westerback (krw@) writes in with his report from [2]a2k19, the hackathon in New Zealand:
Due to an earlier (pre-737Max) airplane problem on the flight back from n2k18 in Usti nad Labem, a loosely worded compensation coupon and the cooperation of beck@ in exploiting said wording, I was able to fly Business Class over the Pacific and thus arrived well rested in BNE. Could have been even more rested if I hadnʼt had to rouse myself to raise a(nother) glass of champagne as we crossed the date line and it became someoneʼs birthday. First world problems.

 The alert reader will have noted that BNE is not where a2k19 was. But beck@ and I had decided to personally drag various Australians onto the flight to Wellington the next day.

[3]Read more…

Contributed by [4]Peter N. M. Hansteen on 2019-03-10 from the table of the man dept.

Ingo Schwarze wrote in with the announcement of a new [5]mandoc release. Ingo writes,
I just released mandoc-1.14.5. This is a regular maintenance release. As structural changes are quite limited, i expect it to be very stable, so all downstream systems are encouraged to upgrade from any earlier version.

[6]Read more…

Contributed by [7]rueda on 2019-03-06 from the do devices hotplug counterclockwise down under dept.

We are delighted to have received an [8]a2k19 hackathon report: Antoine Jacoutot (ajacoutot@) writes:
Better (very) late than never… hereʼs my small report about my [9]a2k19 hackathon slacking time in Wellington (NZ).

 The "Antipodean" hackathon they call it. Indeed, it took me 28h to get there from Paris via Singapore! Fortunately, I met with phessler@ and cheloha@ right on arrival at the airport. From there we went directly into town to visit the different bars with mlarkin@ as our guide :-).
 The challenge was to find a way to keep us awake (12h of jet lag for me), and going around 6 different bars did the trick :-)

[10]Read more…

Contributed by Sebastian Benoit (benno@) on 2019-02-26 from the token dept.

SSH is an awesome tool. Logging into other machines securely is so pervasive to us sysadmins nowadays that few of us think about whatʼs going on underneath. Even more so once you start using the more advanced features such as the [11]ssh-agent, [12]agent-forwarding and [13]ProxyJump. When doing so, care must be taken in order to not compromise oneʼs logins or ssh keys.

[14]Read more…

4 comments (27d18:05 ago)

Contributed by [15]Paul ʼWEiRDʼ de Weerd on 2019-02-27 from the time flies dept.

Itʼs that time of year again; Theo (deraadt@) has [16]just tagged [17]6.5-beta. A good reminder for us all run an extra test install and see if your favorite port still works as you expect.

CVSROOT: /cvs Module name: src Changes by: deraadt@cvs.openbsd.org 2019/02/26 15:24:41 Modified files: etc/root : root.mail share/mk : sys.mk sys/conf : newvers.sh sys/sys : ktrace.h param.h usr.bin/signify: signify.1 sys/arch/macppc/stand/tbxidata: bsd.tbxi Log message: crank to 6.5-beta

Contributed by [18]rueda on 2019-02-23 from the Virtually Problematic Njetworks dept.

Landry Breuil (landry@) has [19]committed a work-in-progress FAQ section "[20]Virtual Private Networks (VPN)":

CVSROOT: /cvs Module name: www Changes by: landry@cvs.openbsd.org 2019/02/22 15:07:05 Modified files: faq : index.html Added files: faq : faq17.html Log message: Add a (wip!) VPN FAQ, because ʼHow do i VPN with OpenBSD?ʼ seems to be a frequently asked question, and IPSec is hard. Now is the time to polish it in-tree. With feedback from solene@, tj@, tb@ & sthen@, thanks! ok tb@ tj@

Contributed by [21]rueda on 2019-02-23 from the all your returns are belong to us dept.

Todd Mortimer (mortimer@) has [22]committed improvements to (the anti-[23]ROP) [24]"X86FixupGadgets" pass of [25]clang(1) for amd64 and i386:

CVSROOT: /cvs Module name: src Changes by: mortimer@cvs.openbsd.org 2019/02/22 08:28:43 Modified files: gnu/llvm/lib/Target/X86: X86FixupGadgets.cpp X86InstrCompiler.td X86MCInstLower.cpp gnu/llvm/tools/clang/include/clang/Driver: Options.td gnu/llvm/tools/clang/lib/Driver/ToolChains: Clang.cpp share/man/man1 : clang-local.1 Log message: Improve the X86FixupGadgets pass: - Target all four kinds of return bytes (c2, c3, ca, cb) - Fix up instructions using both ModR/M and SIB bytes - Force alignment before instructions with return bytes in immediates - Force alignment before instructions that have return bytes in their encoding - Add a command line switch to toggle the functionality. ok deraadt@

This extends the [26]previous work to cover even more cases which (previously potentially) could be exploited as return instructions.

Contributed by [27]Peter N. M. Hansteen on 2019-02-19 from the ffwd all the vlans dept.

Hrvoje Popovski wrote in to alert us that Martin Pieuchot (mpi@) has written a new blog post entitled [28]Faster vlan(4) forwarding?, which leads in with
Two years ago we [29]observed that [30]vlan(4) performances suffered from the locks added to the [31]queueing API. At that time, the use of [32]SRP was also pointed out as a possible responsible for the regression. Since dlg@ [33]recently [34]reworked if_enqueue() to allow pseudo-drivers to bypass the use of queues, and their associated locks, letʼs dive into [35]vlan(4) performances again.

Read the whole thing here: [36]Faster vlan(4) forwarding?

Contributed by [37]rueda on 2019-02-11 from the diving-into-base dept.

[38]openrsync, a clean-room implementation of [39]rsync, is being developed by [40]Kristaps Dzonsons as part of [41]the rpki-client(1) project [featured in an [42]earlier article]. openrsync(1) has been [43]imported into the tree (as "rsync") by Sebastian Benoit (benno@):

CVSROOT: /cvs Module name: src Changes by: benno@cvs.openbsd.org 2019/02/10 16:18:28 Added files: usr.bin/rsync : Makefile TODO.md blocks.c child.c client.c downloader.c extern.h fargs.c flist.c hash.c io.c log.c main.c md4.c md4.h mkpath.c receiver.c rsync.1 rsync.5 rsyncd.5 sender.c server.c session.c socket.c symlinks.c uploader.c Log message: Import Kristapsʼ openrsync into the tree. OK deraadt@

The "Security" section on the [44]GitHub site contains a description of openrsyncʼs use of OpenBSDʼs security features.

At the time of writing, rsync is not yet linked to the build.

References

Visible links
1. https://undeadly.org/
2. https://www.openbsd.org/hackathons.html#a2k19
3. http://www.undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20190324141227
4. http://bsdly.blogspot.com/
5. http://man.openbsd.org/mandoc
6. http://www.undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20190310175719
7. https://www.openbsdfoundation.org/donations.html
8. https://www.openbsd.org/hackathons.html#a2k19
9. https://www.openbsd.org/hackathons.html#a2k19
10. http://www.undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20190309000023
11. https://man.openbsd.org/ssh-agent
12. https://man.openbsd.org/ssh#A
13. https://man.openbsd.org/ssh_config#ProxyJump
14. http://www.undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20190302235509
15. https://undeadly.org/
16. https://marc.info/?l=openbsd-cvs&m=155124147409929&w=2
17. http://www.openbsd.org/65.html
18. https://www.openbsdfoundation.org/donations.html
19. https://marc.info/?l=openbsd-cvs&m=155087324104898&w=2
20. https://www.openbsd.org/faq/faq17.html
21. https://www.openbsdfoundation.org/donations.html
22. https://marc.info/?l=openbsd-cvs&m=155084933828723&w=2
23. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Return-oriented_programming
24. https://man.openbsd.org/clang-local
25. https://man.openbsd.org/clang
26. https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20180606064444
27. http://bsdly.blogspot.com/
28. http://www.grenadille.net/post/2019/02/18/Faster-vlan%284%29-forwarding
29. http://www.undeadly.org/post/2017/02/13/What-happened-to-my-vlan
30. http://man.openbsd.org/OpenBSD-current/man4/vlan.4
31. http://man.openbsd.org/OpenBSD-current/man9/ifq_enqueue.9
32. http://man.openbsd.org/OpenBSD-current/man9/srp_enter.9
33. https://marc.info/?l=openbsd-cvs&m=154699647614720&w=2
34. https://marc.info/?l=openbsd-cvs&m=154699664314769&w=2
35. http://man.openbsd.org/OpenBSD-current/man4/vlan.4
36. http://www.grenadille.net/post/2019/02/18/Faster-vlan%284%29-forwarding
37. https://www.openbsdfoundation.org/donations.html
38. https://github.com/kristapsdz/openrsync
39. https://rsync.samba.org/
40. https://github.com/kristapsdz
41. https://medium.com/@jobsnijders/a-proposal-for-a-new-rpki-validator-openbsd-rpki-client-1-15b74e7a3f65
42. http://www.undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20181130162059
43. https://marc.info/?l=openbsd-cvs&m=154984072229951&w=2
44. https://github.com/kristapsdz/openrsync

HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 91 - Loop: 164 - Rank min: 80 - Author rank: 34
 
I don't usually make these kind of predictions, and I really hope this turns out to be wrong. So hear me out, because I think this needs to be said, and getting this out now could be a sort of "information inoculation" in case they really do decide to go ahead and attempt something like this.

Image/photo

So as many of you may know, this is an election year here in Canada. In October we again go to the polls, and Trudeau is suffering his lowest popularity ever. At least domestically. The whole SNC-Lavalin corruption scandal is mostly out of the news cycle now but is still fresh in people's minds. Honestly I don't even think most Canadians fully understand what exactly it was all about, but I noticed it didn't stop them from using it as a jump off point to express their contempt for him. (Probably there are some other more basic reasons Canadians dislike him, but we won't get into that here, the point is, if the election were to happen today, The Liberal Party would lose and Trudeau would be out.)

The Trudeau Liberals are still enjoying a majority government (for now,) and one of the things they are using it for is to ram through some new restrictions on legal gun owners. (Bill C-71.) Since last year's Danforth shooting in Toronto, they are even talking about a ban on handguns, (something which of course would only affect law abiding legal owners. (It's worth noting that a handgun ban wouldn't have prevented the Danforth shooting since Faisal Hussain had acquired the gun from his brother who was a gang member. The gun used was never legal or registered in the first place. The vast majority of gun crime in Canada is done with unregistered firearms that were smuggled across the border. A legalist gun ban would have had no effect on this.))

Anyway, some of my gun owning friends are thinking that Trudeau might use the issue of gun violence and gun control legislation, and make it a national issue as a way to distract from his own sinking popularity. This agenda is already being pushed, but currently they're not making such a big stink about it, (of course this would cost them the rural voters...)




Now everyone is noticing what when down in New Zealand at that mosque and how their Prime Minister not only used it as a massive virtue signaling opportunity, but also managed to quickly ram through some pretty major gun-control legislation. I'm sure the Trudeau Liberals noticed this and maybe even got some ideas. I mean Trudeau's carbon tax is unpopular, and in France I'm sure he noticed their fuel tax really didn't work out too good... but this mosque shooting thing really worked good for NZ PM Jacinda Ardern. The Liberal Party are smart enough to notice what works, especially now that they're desperate.

So here's where my prediction comes in. (I think you probably know where I'm going with this by now.) We know that Trudeau is well connected to the deep state, he's an asset (not unlike Obama.) My worry here is that sometime this year, before the October election, there may be a false flag shooting event in Canada. The target could be a school, a mall, a mosque or whatever, what's more important is that the patsy will be a white male who's politically right-wing. The narrative will be something the Trudeau Liberals can use against their opposition (The Conservative Party,) they'll use it to claim they were right all along about needing more gun control, that conservatives are holding this back and threatening public safety, and of course there will be plenty of condemnations and virtue signaling by smug Liberals. The resulting media circus would probably be enough to get Trudeau reelected.

Of course, I hope my prediction turns out to be wrong, I would be happy to be proven wrong here... but just in case, I wanted to put this out there. Not to be able to say "I told you so" but to put the idea out there ahead of time so that if they do decide to try something like this, then there is at least a chance that people will see it for what it is and hopefully expose it before it's too late.

Once they take your rights, they never give them back... and it seems these days people around the world are losing rights faster than ever before. :o




#2019 #Prediction #Politics #Canada #Election #PM #Trudeau #Liberals #Lavalin #Scandal #Corruption #SNCLavalin #SNC-Lavalin #GunControl #Gun-Control #Law #Legislation #Legalism #BillC-71 #BillC71 #C-71 #Terrorism #FalseFlag #False-Flag #Terror #Hoax #ISIS #NZ #NewZealand #TheState #Crown #TheCrown #DeepState #Deep-State #PsyOps #Manipulation #Media #MSM #Pub #Public
 

Microsoft delivers public preview of Windows Virtual Desktop


#delivers #desktop #microsoft #preview #public #virtual #windows
 

Saving of public Google+ content by the Archive Team has begun


25 votes and 8 comments so far on Reddit
Article word count: 2032

HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19407865
Posted by danso (karma: 106821)
Post stats: Points: 122 - Comments: 58 - 2019-03-16T14:06:56Z

#HackerNews #archive #begun #content #google #has #public #saving #team #the
Article content:

The archiving of public Google+ content to the [1]Internet Archive by the [2]ArchiveTeam has has begun.

What does this mean, how does this affect you, and what can you do?

TL;DR: Most public Google+ content should live on at the Internet Archive thanks to a fanatical bunch of volunteers, and you can help.

The Internet Archive

The Internet Archive is a digital library with the stated mission of "universal access to all knowledge". Though often known for its Web archives, the "[3]Wayback Machine", it also preserves texts, audio, video, software, and other formats. Think of the Wayback Machine as the Webʼs attic, or basement, or storage locker.

[4]https://www.archive.org/

[5]Wikipedia has a good article on the Internet Archive.

The Archive Team
Archive Team is a loose collective of rogue archivists, programmers, writers and loudmouths dedicated to saving our digital heritage. Since 2009 this variant force of nature has caught wind of shutdowns, shutoffs, mergers, and plain old deletions - and done our best to save the history before itʼs lost forever.

[6]https://www.archiveteam.org/

The Archive Team works closely with, but is not affiliated with the Internet Archive. It runs projects to save bits of Web history that appear likely to be lost. Past projects include Mozilla Addons, Tindeck, and UOL Forums (the "Brazillian AOL"), whilst present projects include Flickr and Tumblr, as well as several manual projects. The group maintains [7]Deathwatch and [8]Fire Drill lists of sites or platforms thought to be in peril or of significance.

Archive Team have previously saved other social media site content, and have several on their watchlists, including larger sites such as YouTube, Facebook, CodeAcademy, LiveJournal, Reddit, Twitter, WikiLeaks, and Wikipedia. This group thinks big.

Archive projects run using a tool called "Warrior", based on "grabber" scripts, which run in a virtual machine (VirtualBox, VMWare, or other virtualisation systems) on a desktop or server system. Current Warrior images are available online: [9]https://www.archiveteam.org/index.php?title=Warrior

More on Warrior below under "What can you do?".

Thereʼs an IRC channel on EFnet: [10]irc://irc.efnet.org/#archiveteam

And a subreddit: [11]https://old.reddit.com/r/Archiveteam/

The Google+ Archive Project

Archive Team became aware that Google+ was shutting down in December of 2018. The G+MM / Plexodus effort became aware of Archive Team in January of 2019. Weʼve been sharing information and planning over the past few months, including the copious information weʼve collected on Google+ size, activity, profiles, communities, and characteristics of the site and platform.

Thereʼs a (not particularly up-to-date) Wiki page largely consisting of Googleʼs shutdown announcements: [12]https://www.archiveteam.org/index.php?title=Google%2B

The actual archive code lives on GitHub: [13]https://github.com/ArchiveTeam/googleplus-grab

The more interesting project tracker, showing updates in realtime, is: [14]http://tracker.archiveteam.org/googleplus/

Note that this shows only 1/50th of the total project at a time. "Items" are sitemap subsets of 100 profiles, and 50 batches of 1,000 sitemaps at a time, each with about 680 or so items, will be processed over the course of this archival. The tracker shows the status only of the current batch. Total profiles archived are 50 batches * 1,000 sitemaps/batch * 680 items/sitemap * 100 profiles/item = 3.4 billion profiles, or the total number of Google+ profiles (as of March, 2017). There will be 34 million items, total, in the overall process.

How does this affect you as a Google+ user?

If you do absolutely nothing, there is a very good chance that much of your public Google+ content will be preserved by Archive Team, on the Internet Archive, and will be publicly visible there.

If you do want this to happen ... youʼre in luck. Donʼt delete your Google+ content or profile and it should be saved.

If you donʼt want this to happen, you can request removal of specific items through the Internet Archiveʼs procedure: [15]https://help.archive.org/hc/en-us/articles/360018138951-How-do-I-remove-an-item-page-from-the-site-

If you want to help, keep reading.

Limitations

There are a few limitations to this project:
* Only public content that is presently available on Google+ is being included. Private posts, and any previously deleted content will not be saved. (Previously saved content thatʼs since been deleted will be available.)

 * Full post comments may not be archived. Google+ allows up to 500 comments per post, but only presents a subset of these as static HTML. Itʼs not clear that long discussion threads will be preserved. Historically they have not been.

 * Image and video content may not be preserved at full resolution. This will apply mostly to high-def image and video content, though photographers may want to be aware.

 * Content archival is subject to the rate at which the project can proceed and any limitations imposed outside its control. From past experience, the Archive Team can suck in amazing amounts of data quickly, and general success is likely.

What can you do to help?

Contributions can be made in the way of funds or volunteering services, particularly as an archive Warrior, running an archive instance yourself.

The Internet Archive is fueled by donations, which provide servers, disk, and bandwidth to receive and share content. It costs the Archive about $2,000 to host 1 terabyte of data:

[16]https://archive.org/donate

Donate to the Archive Team directly

For the most part, contributing to the Internet Archive is strongly encouraged, as they do the heavy lifting, but Archive Team has its own smaller contributions project:

[17]https://opencollective.com/archiveteam

If you have the technical resources and skills, run a Warrior instance

People with access to large-scale storage and high-bandwidth network connections are especially appreciated.

What youʼll need:
* A desktop, server computer, or "cloud" hosted system(s),

 * A Virtual Machine server, including VirtualBox, VMWare, Docker and Hyper-V.

 * At least 60 GB of free disk space.

 * At least TK of free memory.

 * A sufficiently high-bandwidth connection. 100 Mb/s+ or better is recommended.

 * Skills and understanding to run all of this.

If you donʼt understand part or any of this or the referenced documentation, and cannot get up and running by yourself, weʼll manage without you. Self-supporting volunteers are appreciated.

Archive Warriors volunteer their time, resources, and services, there is no compensation. If you wish to solicit donations on your own, you may do so.

There are a set of requirements for your Internet connection itself. Please do NOT run a Warrior instance if any of the following apply:
* No OpenDNS. No ISP DNS that redirects to a search page. Use non-captive DNS servers.

 * No ISP connections that inject advertisements into web pages.

 * No proxies. Proxies can return bad data. The original HTTP headers and IP address are needed for the WARC file.

 * No content-filtering firewalls.

 * No censorship. If you believe your country implements censorship, do not run a warrior.

 * No Tor. The server may return an error page instead of content if they ban exit nodes.

 * No free cafe wifi. Archiving your cafeʼs wifi service agreement repeatedly is not helpful.

 * No VPNs. Data integrity is a very high priority for the Archive Team so use of VPNs with the official crawler is discouraged.

 * We prefer connections from many public IP addresses if possible. (For example, if your apartment building uses a single IP address, we donʼt want your apartment banned.)

There are additional information, instructions, troubleshooting, and guidance at the [18]Archive Team Warrior Wiki page:

[19]https://www.archiveteam.org/index.php?title=ArchiveTeam_Warrior

And on the [20]googleplus-grab GitHub page

https://github.com/ArchiveTeam/googleplus-grab

Note that Warrior utilises a specially [Lua]([21]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lua_(programming_language)-instrumented version of [22]wget to produce [23]WARC images, a standard developed by the Internet Archive and very widely adopted, as the Library of Congress link above indicates.

(The Internet Archive and Archive Team are generally not interested in your helpful comments and/or suggestions about alternative technologies, unless youʼre exceptionally qualified on the matter.)

When you launch the Warrior youʼll be presented with a list of current projects. Select the "Googleplus" project to archive Google+ content.

If your bandwidth is shared, limited, or metered, you can specifically limit bandwidth usage through the virtual machine, [24]see instructions for specific VMs.

You can request or add specific URLs to the Internet Archive directly

Itʼs possible to save items directly to the Internet Archive by other mechanisms. This is independent of the Archive Teamʼs GooglePlus project and does not affect either the content they collect or the fetchlist compilation.

Methods may be appropriate for single items or large-scale (100s, 1,000s, or 1,000,000s) of requests. So long as requests are legitimate, they are actively encouraged by the Archive.
Using the Wayback Machine

Single pages may be saved by navigating to [25]https://web.archive.org/ and entering the URL into the "Save Page Now" form (should be on the right side of the page).
Using DuckDuckGo

The !wayback [26]bang search will search for a page in the Internet Archive. If it is not found there will be a dialogue on the result page offering to "save page now".

Alternatives are !waybackmachine and !wbm.

There is also a !save bang but this is broken and does not work. This has been reported to DDG, though itʼs not yet fixed.
Using Internet Archive browser extensions

These are a bit more cumbersome than Iʼd like but there are extensions for all major browsers as well as iOS and Android which allow interactions with the Internet Archive, including a "save page now" feature. See: "[27]If you See Something, Save Something", listing extensions for [28]Chrome, [29]Firefox, [30]Safari, [31]iOS, [32]Android, and a [33]Javascript Bookmarklet.
Using the "save" URL format

If you want to save a large number of URLs, or save them from a command line, you can use a specific URL format to do so:

https://web.archive.org/save/

Where is the page you want to save. For example, to save the Google+ Mass Migration Community homepage, at [34]https://plus.google.com/communities/112164273001338979772, youʼd use:

https://plus.google.com/communities/112164273001338979772" target="_blank">https://web.archive.org/save/https://plus.google.com/communities/112164273001338979772

This can be scripted for both individual and large-scale batch archival. For Linux, MacOS / OSX, BSD, and other Unix-like operating systems (including Android with Termux, or Windows, with a Unix/Linux environment), the following script (Iʼve saved this as archive-url) will archive the requested URL:

#!/bin/bash
# archive-url
# Archive selected URL at the Internet Archive curl -s -I -H "Accept: application/json" "https://web.archive.org/save/${1}" |
grep ʼ^x-cache-key:ʼ | sed "s,https,&://,; s,(${1}).*$,\1,"

Save that to your execution path (Iʼve chosen ~/bin, you might use /usr/local/bin or another location on your $PATH, and invoke as, say (again referring to the G+MM homepage):

$ archive-url https://plus.google.com/communities/112164273001338979772

If you have a list of URLs in a file (or pipelined from command output), you can request all of them to be archived in a simple bash loop. Iʼm using xargs here to run ten simultaneous requests from the file gplus-urllist:

cat gplus_urllist | while read url do xargs -I{} -P 10 archive-url {}; done

Iʼve run this on over 10,000 URLs over a modest residential broadband connection in a hair over two hours.

Note that such requests trigger an archive by the Internet Archive from one of its archiving nodes, youʼre not sending the page to the Archive yourself. In particular, archival from regions defaulting to another language may result in the Google+ site content (but not post or comments) being in a different language. Iʼve frequently seen my pages turning up in Japanese, for instance.

How can I specifically access archived content later?

If you know the URL of the item, you can request it directly from the Internet Archive. The browser extensions above can simplify this for you. There are also specific tools for querying and interacting with the Wayback Machine repository.

Again, using DuckDuckGo (especially when setting this as your default browser), you can access pages directly using the !wayback bang search, entered before the URL in your browserʼs Navigation bar.

Command-line use of the Internet Archive is limited as the site now depends on JavaScript. Tools such as curl, wget, GET, or console browsers including lynx, links, elinks, w3m, etc., can not access archived content directly. Youʼll need a graphical browser.

There are a set of [35]Wayback Machine APIs which can test for archives of a known URL.

From a given Wayback Machine page, you can generally search for all pages under some specific URL. This is of mixed use for Google+ content:
* Google+ post URLs are given by userID or novelty URL, so you should be able to search for all content by a specific user or Google+ Page profile.

 * Google+ Collection, Community, and some other selections, are not indicated by URL. The Wayback Machine has no intrinsic way of knowing what content belongs to what Collection or Community.

There are tools to assist with [36]rebuilding websites based on Wayback Machine archives. Whether or not these will support Google+ user, Page, Collection, or Community accounts is not presently clear, though weʼll try to provide information as it becomes available.

Tools:

There may be other ways for searching for or accessing content on the Wayback Machine, and weʼll add information as we receive it.

Thanks ...

... to the Archive Team for taking this on, the Internet Archive for hosting it, and to Fusl for answering all my pesky questions over the past few hours on the details of processing.

References

Visible links
1. https://web.archive.org/
2. https://www.archiveteam.org/
3. https://web.archive.org/
4. https://www.archive.org/
5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Archive
6. https://www.archiveteam.org/
7. https://www.archiveteam.org/index.php?title=Deathwatch
8. https://www.archiveteam.org/index.php?title=Fire_Drill
9. https://www.archiveteam.org/index.php?title=Warrior
10. irc://irc.efnet.org/#archiveteam
11. https://old.reddit.com/r/Archiveteam/
12. https://www.archiveteam.org/index.php?title=Google%2B
13. https://github.com/ArchiveTeam/googleplus-grab
14. http://tracker.archiveteam.org/googleplus/
15. https://help.archive.org/hc/en-us/articles/360018138951-How-do-I-remove-an-item-page-from-the-site-
16. https://archive.org/donate
17. https://opencollective.com/archiveteam
18. https://www.archiveteam.org/index.php?title=ArchiveTeam_Warrior
19. https://www.archiveteam.org/index.php?title=ArchiveTeam_Warrior
20. https://github.com/ArchiveTeam/googleplus-grab
21. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lua_(programming_language)-instrumented
22. https://github.com/ArchiveTeam/wget-lua
23. https://www.loc.gov/preservation/digital/formats/fdd/fdd000236.shtml
24. https://www.archiveteam.org/index.php?title=ArchiveTeam_Warrior#The_warrior_is_eating_all_my_bandwidth.21
25. https://web.archive.org/
26. https://duckduckgo.com/bang?q=wayback
27. https://blog.archive.org/2017/01/25/see-something-save-something/
28. https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/wayback-machine/fpnmgdkabkmnadcjpehmlllkndpkmiak
29. https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/wayback-machine_new/
30. https://safari-extensions.apple.com/details/?id=archive.org.waybackmachine-ZSFX78H3ZT
31. https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/wayback-machine/id1201888313
32. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.archive.waybackmachine
33. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:Using_the_Wayback_Machine#JavaScript_bookmarklet
34. https://plus.google.com/communities/112164273001338979772
35. https://archive.org/help/wayback_api.php
36. https://help.archive.org/hc/en-us/articles/360001834411-Can-I-rebuild-my-website-using-the-Wayback-Machine-

HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 100 - Loop: 261 - Rank min: 100 - Author rank: 89
 
The Vineyard

4/14/06 From The Lord, Our God and Savior
The Word of The Lord Spoken to Timothy
For All Those Who Have Ears to Hear

Thus says The Lord: Peoples of the #earth, I had sent to you The #Messiah, The Sower of the #seeds of #salvation. Yet to you, He has become an object of #scorn and His words cause for disdain. For you do always contend with Me, a most arrogant and deceived #people who revile My #Word and reject My #Commandments, saying, “I answer to no one, nor to any god. I am who I am, and I go my own way.” For #truth has perished among you; it has altogether been cut off from your #mouth.
Therefore are the pleasant #fields left desolate, and the peaceful #pastures laid waste, for there is no latter #rain. For the #heart of this #generation has turned against Me. Their consciences are defiled as they embrace every #evil #thought and intention, a #base people #lost in their own bitterness, who turn #justice into #wormwood and cast #righteousness to the #ground.

My #vineyard has produced wild #grapes!...

Behold, #roots of rottenness plunge #deep,
As great #vines of wickedness reach
Unto the ends of the earth!...

Therefore I must break down the #walls,
And #tear out the #hedges, and destroy
All these #briers and #thorns...

I must #tread them down, until nothing remains!...

Says The Lord.

Therefore thus says The Lord to the oppressor, to the haughty, the high-minded and the #hypocrite: #Mankind shall be #cast down! I shall throw down the #kingdoms of #men and bring terrible #judgment upon the wicked! The oppressor shall be cut in pieces and the haughty broken, the high-minded abased and the hypocrite put to shame!
Thus the prideful shall in no wise escape the Day of The Lord, and the insolent shall be left to wallow in the darkness of their own #understanding. For all the #children of disobedience must #walk through the #valley, to the shedding of many #tears. For as it is written: There shall be wailing in the #public squares, and in every #street they shall #cry, “Woe is me! Woe is me!” They shall summon the #farmer to #mourning and call for the skillful lamenters to wail on their behalf. And in all vineyards, there shall be wailing. For I shall surely pass through, says The Lord.

#prophecy #prophet #Jesus #Yeshua #Christ #Messiah #God #church #bible #scripture #christian #christianity #JesusChrist #HolySpirit #Savior #Saviour #Lord
 
yes but don’t they receive tax incentives? the people should own it.
Well, let's go bigger: are they a publisher, or a platform? :
The #Internet #Association, which represents Facebook, #Google, #Twitter, and other major platforms, claims that #Section230 is necessary for these firms to “provide #forums and tools for the #public to engage in a wide variety of activities that the #First #Amendment protects.” But rather than #facilitate free speech, #Silicon #Valley now uses Section 230 to justify #censorship, leading to a #legal and policy muddle. For instance, in response to a #lawsuit challenging its speech policies, Google claimed that restricting its right to censor would “impose liability on YouTube as a publisher.” In the same motion, Google argues that its right to restrict political content also derives from its “First Amendment protection for a publisher’s editorial judgments,” which “encompasses the choice of how to present, or even whether to present, particular content.”

The dominant #social #media companies must choose: if they are neutral platforms, they should have immunity from litigation. If they are publishers making editorial choices, then they should relinquish this valuable exemption.

They can’t claim that Section 230 immunity is necessary to protect free speech, while they shape, control, and censor the speech on their platforms.


Either the courts or Congress should clarify the matter.

~from here
 

Googling Strangers: One Professor's Lesson on Privacy in Public Spaces


Kate Klonick asked her law students at St. John's University to try to identify people they came across in public, based solely on what they said and wore. It was surprisingly easy.
Article word count: 868

HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19362793
Posted by walterbell (karma: 37701)
Post stats: Points: 100 - Comments: 50 - 2019-03-11T21:02:09Z

#HackerNews #googling #lesson #one #privacy #professors #public #spaces #strangers
Article content:




Kate Klonick, assistant professor of law at St. Johnʼs University, gave her students an optional assignment for spring break: Try to identify a stranger based solely on what they reveal in public. Above, strangers commuting in London.

Classen Rafael / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Charlotte Lehman could hear the man reading his credit card number out loud from across the Starbucks.

He was speaking to a companion, but his voice carried over the music to where Lehman sat. Surrounded by a dozen or so people, the speaker also divulged his phone number and home address.

After that, all it took for Lehman to identify him was a quick Google search. She was able to find the manʼs full name, what he does for a living and his professional website. She even heard him sharing a password.

Lehman, a third year law student, wasnʼt Googling the stranger for fun. She was on a homework assignment from her professor — to "de-anonymize" someone in a public place.

Kate Klonick, assistant professor of law at St. Johnʼs University, where Lehman studies, says she gave her students the task as an optional assignment for spring break. The goal: Try to identify a person based solely on what they reveal in public, including anything displayed on their clothing or bags, like a monogram or a school logo.

At first, her students joked that the assignment was a little "creepy," Klonick tells Scott Simon in an interview with NPRʼs Weekend Edition. But her goal wasnʼt for them to use or share that information.

Instead, she wanted them to understand the gap between our perception of how much privacy we think we have in public spaces — and the reality. And, as she puts it, "to show them how thin our privacy constructions are in the modern day."

Her students, who scattered across the country for break, started writing to her in astonishment. Some of the most outspoken skeptics of privacy protections in her class — the ones who once suggested that they didnʼt need privacy because they had [1]nothing to hide — were stunned at how quickly theyʼd found out details of the lives of strangers who happened to cross their paths.

"Itʼs really quite easy," Klonick says. "Which is part of ... the scary, kind of, learning tool about this exercise."

One student found the name of a man on a plane after hearing him arrange his pickup from the airport. Another [2]pinned down the identity of a stranger on a train by putting together the name of the college on his shirt with a first name overheard in conversation.

Then there was Lehman.

"I was shocked because I wasnʼt even trying," Lehman says. "It didnʼt seem like anyone was paying attention, but he divulged so much personal information."

Thatʼs not out of the ordinary, according to Klonick. "People think they are private because theyʼre obscure, because theyʼre one of many."

Whether youʼre in a cheering stadium or a packed commuter train, itʼs easy to assume that no one is paying attention to you. And before smartphones, even if someone overheard your conversation, theyʼd usually have a hard time piecing together whatever information they gathered. The level of effort required to get a complete picture of your identity would, effectively, serve as a deterrent and a privacy protection.

Not anymore. With Google at our fingertips, itʼs increasingly easy to learn a lot about a stranger, even with just a few details.

Klonick says the assignment "shows us at the very least that lot of the older mechanisms we used to have to protect privacy are no longer particularly robust in the Internet age, obscurity being one of them."

Sheʼs quick to point out that most people arenʼt going to Google the person in line next to them at the grocery store. But they could. And thatʼs what she hoped her students would take away from the assignment.

"What I was really trying to teach them is that we have very few laws that do this type of protection — and we might not even want them — but that there have to be some type of protections for privacy," Klonick says. So whether itʼs new laws or something as simple as more entrenched norms around respecting privacy, "we have to be really conscious of those and do a little more education on some of those things if we want to create future protections, either in law or just in society in general."

The lesson was not lost on Lehman. She says sheʼs been thinking more about the evolving landscape of privacy law — and looking forward to meeting with her class again this week. Sheʼs curious about what her classmates learned, especially the ones who were most casual about their own privacy.

As for her own expectation of privacy, sheʼs already more conscious of what she reveals inadvertently, even when sheʼs just chatting with her sister.

Sheʼs realized that a few words about something as innocuous as her dogs, which she likes to feature on Instagram, could be enough for a stranger to identify either one of them. And that, she says, is at least a little unsettling.

Ed McNulty edited this story for broadcast.

References

Visible links
1. https://twitter.com/Klonick/status/1102970735813746688
2. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/08/opinion/google-privacy.html

HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 83 - Loop: 335 - Rank min: 80 - Author rank: 49
 

Major bank accidentally published a private package to the public NPM Registry


“A major international bank accidentally published a private package of their own to the public npm Registry, took 3 years to notice, and then sent DMCA takedown notices to Amazon and Cloudflare for…
Article word count: 676

HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19362297
Posted by edward (karma: 21693)
Post stats: Points: 222 - Comments: 94 - 2019-03-11T20:07:27Z

#HackerNews #accidentally #bank #major #npm #package #private #public #published #registry #the
Article content:

Image/photo

[1] [IMG][2]Laurie Voss‏ @seldo [3]5h5 hours ago
* 
 * 

A major international bank accidentally published a private package of their own to the public npm Registry, took 3 years to notice, and then sent DMCA takedown notices to Amazon and Cloudflare for hosting "stolen code". Now I have to pay a lawyer to explain this to them.

[4] [IMG][5]Laurie Voss‏ @seldo [6]5h5 hours ago
* 
 * 

We sell a thing that prevents this kind of mistake, it is called npm Enterprise, you should all really look into it instead of making me spend money to explain how npm publish works to your lawyer.

Show this thread
[7] [IMG][8]Laurie Voss‏ @seldo [9]5h5 hours ago
* 
 * 

(I should make clear that this kind of legal confusion happens ALL THE TIME and is a genuine source of overhead in running the registry)

Show this thread
[10] [IMG][11]Laurie Voss‏ @seldo [12]5h5 hours ago
* 
 * 

Our lawyer is also going to need to explain to a bank why a React package does not constitute "Stolen Financial Credentials" oh lord

Show this thread
[13] [IMG][14]Anthony Maton‏ @Maton_Anthony [15]4h4 hours ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [16]@seldo

This is the exact reason why where I work, the corporate proxy prevents pushing to npm and all publication of company code is done through a regulated delivery pipeline. I hope this wonʼt cost npm too much :(

[17] [IMG][18]Laurie Voss‏ @seldo [19]4h4 hours ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [20]@Maton_Anthony

The package in question contains a README with details of the companyʼs own proxy for the same purpose, so presumably such measures are not 100% effective.

[21] [IMG][22]Liam Dawson‏ @liamdaws [23]1h1 hour ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [24]@seldo

[25]pic.twitter.com/HfcrE0nVI7

[26] [IMG][27]Rob Kielty‏ @RobKielty [28]3h3 hours ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [29]@seldo

Wouldnʼt be at all surprised if an internal dev within the bank could have explained it to the legal team, if only they had been asked.

[30] [IMG][31]Laurie Voss‏ @seldo [32]3h3 hours ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [33]@RobKielty

I think said dev was too busy hoping nobody noticed theyʼd accidentally published bank IP to the public internet.

[34] [IMG][35]Rob Kielty‏ @RobKielty [36]3h3 hours ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [37]@seldo

True! Hope it works out okay, it really sucks that you have to deal with this kind of nonsense.

[38] [IMG][39]Mike Coon‏ @mikeonitstuff [40]3h3 hours ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [41]@seldo

Do you then invoice them for the cost of your lawyer?

[42] [IMG][43]Laurie Voss‏ @seldo [44]3h3 hours ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [45]@mikeonitstuff

Sadly, lawyers do not work that way.

[46] [IMG][47]Mike Coon‏ @mikeonitstuff [48]3h3 hours ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [49]@seldo

Oh. I get that. Doesnʼt prevent you from invoicing them though. And thereʼs evidence that their internal controls are shoddy. AP might just pay.

[50] [IMG][51]TProphet‏ @TProphet [52]3h3 hours ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [53]@mikeonitstuff [54]@seldo

If npm wins an enterprise licensing deal as a result itʼs presumably a rounding error. Unconventional deal flow but hey, whatever closes the deal! :)

[55] [IMG][56]Rick Waldron‏ @rwaldron [57]4h4 hours ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [58]@seldo

Wow, this is obnoxious.

[59] [IMG][60]Laurie Voss‏ @seldo [61]3h3 hours ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [62]@rwaldron

Me or them?

[63] [IMG][64]Rick Waldron‏ @rwaldron [65]3h3 hours ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [66]@seldo

Of course not you [67]🤪

[68] [IMG][69]John Feminella‏ @jxxf [70]21m21 minutes ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [71]@seldo

Q: does you make your DMCA takedown notices public?

[72] [IMG][73]Laurie Voss‏ @seldo [74]17m17 minutes ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [75]@jxxf

No. Honestly, I shouldnʼt even have tweeted about this one, even though it wasnʼt a "real" DMCA notice. Most DMCAs we get are valid, people do in fact post actual stolen code pretty often.

[76] [IMG][77]Malte Ubl‏Verified account @cramforce [78]4h4 hours ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [79]@seldo

Last year the [80]@jsconf youtube channel got a DMCA notice and copyright strike, because a company had a fallout with their employee and wanted to take down the videos where they represented them. So incredibly annoying.

[81] [IMG][82]James Milner‏ @JamesLMilner [83]4h4 hours ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [84]@cramforce [85]@seldo [86]@jsconf

Out of interest what was the outcome of that?

[87] [IMG][88]Malte Ubl‏Verified account @cramforce [89]4h4 hours ago
* 
 * 

Replying to [90]@JamesLMilner [91]@seldo [92]@jsconf

Since this wasnʼt about whether weʼd take down the video (we would have if they had asked likely) but rather about the copyright strike, we decided to let it go, because after the plaintiff had been unresponsive for 2x 30 days it had almost expired anyway.

References

Visible links
1. https://twitter.com/seldo
2. https://twitter.com/seldo
3. https://twitter.com/seldo/status/1105153287718723584
4. https://twitter.com/seldo
5. https://twitter.com/seldo
6. https://twitter.com/seldo/status/1105153658998579202
7. https://twitter.com/seldo
8. https://twitter.com/seldo
9. https://twitter.com/seldo/status/1105155780867612673
10. https://twitter.com/seldo
11. https://twitter.com/seldo
12. https://twitter.com/seldo/status/1105157348560007168
13. https://twitter.com/Maton_Anthony
14. https://twitter.com/Maton_Anthony
15. https://twitter.com/Maton_Anthony/status/1105177658676207623
16. https://twitter.com/seldo
17. https://twitter.com/seldo
18. https://twitter.com/seldo
19. https://twitter.com/seldo/status/1105178535440736256
20. https://twitter.com/Maton_Anthony
21. https://twitter.com/liamdaws
22. https://twitter.com/liamdaws
23. https://twitter.com/liamdaws/status/1105210803840475136
24. https://twitter.com/seldo
25. https://t.co/HfcrE0nVI7
26. https://twitter.com/RobKielty
27. https://twitter.com/RobKielty
28. https://twitter.com/RobKielty/status/1105181894470184960
29. https://twitter.com/seldo
30. https://twitter.com/seldo
31. https://twitter.com/seldo
32. https://twitter.com/seldo/status/1105182040188641282
33. https://twitter.com/RobKielty
34. https://twitter.com/RobKielty
35. https://twitter.com/RobKielty
36. https://twitter.com/RobKielty/status/1105184349106900992
37. https://twitter.com/seldo
38. https://twitter.com/mikeonitstuff
39. https://twitter.com/mikeonitstuff
40. https://twitter.com/mikeonitstuff/status/1105184251845201923
41. https://twitter.com/seldo
42. https://twitter.com/seldo
43. https://twitter.com/seldo
44. https://twitter.com/seldo/status/1105185305206841344
45. https://twitter.com/mikeonitstuff
46. https://twitter.com/mikeonitstuff
47. https://twitter.com/mikeonitstuff
48. https://twitter.com/mikeonitstuff/status/1105186857967603712
49. https://twitter.com/seldo
50. https://twitter.com/TProphet
51. https://twitter.com/TProphet
52. https://twitter.com/TProphet/status/1105191892008939521
53. https://twitter.com/mikeonitstuff
54. https://twitter.com/seldo
55. https://twitter.com/rwaldron
56. https://twitter.com/rwaldron
57. https://twitter.com/rwaldron/status/1105173312907460608
58. https://twitter.com/seldo
59. https://twitter.com/seldo
60. https://twitter.com/seldo
61. https://twitter.com/seldo/status/1105179009799774208
62. https://twitter.com/rwaldron
63. https://twitter.com/rwaldron
64. https://twitter.com/rwaldron
65. https://twitter.com/rwaldron/status/1105181050890788864
66. https://twitter.com/seldo
68. https://twitter.com/jxxf
69. https://twitter.com/jxxf
70. https://twitter.com/jxxf/status/1105226508728193025
71. https://twitter.com/seldo
72. https://twitter.com/seldo
73. https://twitter.com/seldo
74. https://twitter.com/seldo/status/1105227417134686209
75. https://twitter.com/jxxf
76. https://twitter.com/cramforce
77. https://twitter.com/cramforce
78. https://twitter.com/cramforce/status/1105173762750668800
79. https://twitter.com/seldo
80. https://twitter.com/jsconf
81. https://twitter.com/JamesLMilner
82. https://twitter.com/JamesLMilner
83. https://twitter.com/JamesLMilner/status/1105176000906907648
84. https://twitter.com/cramforce
85. https://twitter.com/seldo
86. https://twitter.com/jsconf
87. https://twitter.com/cramforce
88. https://twitter.com/cramforce
89. https://twitter.com/cramforce/status/1105177867170734087
90. https://twitter.com/JamesLMilner
91. https://twitter.com/seldo
92. https://twitter.com/jsconf

HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 179 - Loop: 157 - Rank min: 100 - Author rank: 73
 

Venezuelan opposition leader Guaido organizing public sector unions strike


Image/photo

#guaido #juan guaido #leader #maduro regime #nicolas maduro #oan newsroom #opposition #organizing #president nicolas maduro #public #sector #strike #unions #venezuela #venezuelan
Venezuelan opposition leader Guaido organizing public sector unions strike
 

Ghidra, NSA's reverse engineering tool, is now available to the public


HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19315273
Posted by twodayslate (karma: 1336)
Post stats: Points: 144 - Comments: 69 - 2019-03-05T23:41:39Z

#HackerNews #available #engineering #ghidra #now #nsas #public #reverse #the #tool
HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 119 - Loop: 31 - Rank min: 100 - Author rank: 33
 

Acá tienen a uno que pretende hacer con los pods independientes lo mismo que hace EE.UU. con los países soberanos


Image/photo
https://diaspora.com.ar/posts/2756123

Un tal canek (canek@share.naturalnews.com ) del pod share.naturalnews.com, se las da, al igual que EE.UU, de defensor de la "Libertad de expresión" y para eso no se le ocurre mejor idea que hacer una lista negra de lo que llama "Cuck pods" llamando a no registrarse en ellos. Para eso usa un falso criterio de "libertad de expresión" que básicamente consiste en decir y hacer cualquier cosa mientras los podmins mantienen una postura pasiva y permisiva, limitándose solo a la administración técnica del pod que corren.

Nuestro pod fue incluído en su lista negra con la siguiente leyenda que pasaré a responder a continuación. Otros pods incluídos en la lista son pod.disroot.org, diasp.org, nerdpol.ch, pod.geraspora.de. Muchos de los usuarios bloqueados en esos pods son trolls o fascistas cuyas cuentas fueron borradas.
http://diaspora.com.ar

Another cuck pod. This one acts as a national pod calling itself “Diaspora Argentina” yet deletes the accounts of nationalists and right-wingers without warning and has even been known to make public their personal information. (https://diaspora.com.ar/posts/846253) (https://diasp.org/posts/9153227)

El crimen que cometimos según ellos, ofendiendo su criterio de "libertad", es el de haber "borrado cuentas de nacionalistas derechistas (fascistas) sin aviso y haber hecho pública su información personal". Sin embargo, si bien borramos varias cuentas de fascistas, solo en un caso hicimos público su mail, por el carácter violento y pro-genocida de un usuario que era defensor de la dictadura militar argentina, que actuaba como troll y atacaba las publicaciones de personas y organizaciones que defendìan los Derechos Humanos. De hecho sí fue advertido pero continuó con su hostigamiento, no dándonos más remedio que actuar en su contra.
Estos cabeza hueca-liberales condenan con listas negras a quienes actuamos contra fascistas pero nada dicen de estos fascistas cuando atacan a nuestros usuarios y reivindican el asesinato y desaparición de personas.

Su idea de "libertad" parece no aplicarse cuando se trata de proteger a nuestros usuarios y nuestro pod. Es la idea más tonta de libertad :"Sos libre de publicar lo que quieras". No importa ahí la responsabilidad, ni si atacás a alguien, ni importa tampoco la "libertad" de los administradores de permitir o no conductas destructivas dentro del pod. Somos admins y por eso somos unos forros que no tenemos que existir, que no tenemos que "meter mano". Parece como si tuviéramos que ser castigados por tener servidores, por que no sea todo p2p en Internet. No tiene que importar nuestro criterio porque no deberíamos ni existir. Tenemos que dejar que todo fluya frente a nuestros ojos y que cualquiera haga lo que quiera mientras nosotros ponemos la infraestructura, el trabajo, pagamos la luz y mantenemos el server. Y mientras muchos usuarios descansan cómodamente sobre nuestro trabajo para después criticarnos, cuando podrían ellos mismos abrirse su propio pod.

Es que, como dice este tal Canek, "Nosotros nos llamamos a nosotros mismos Diaspora* Argentina". Claro. No es porque seamos el único pod del país, ni el primero. Es porque le robamos a los 40 millones de habitantes la posibilidad de abrirse su propio pod. Hasta el nombre nos critican...
Estoy seguro que a los pods que están llenos de pornografía y pedofilia no los critican ¡No vi ninguno en esa lista! y miren que está lleno de pods así en Diaspora. Esos no son "Cuck pods"...

Entonces, según la idea de estos personajes, si actuamos contra un defensor del genocidio, dejamos de ser un pod libre. ¡Qué idea lineal y estúpida de entender la libertad!
Sin embargo, como en todo grupo social, tenemos nuestras condiciones y "acuerdos de convivencia", no compatibles con lo que hizo aquel sujeto en nuestro pod. Aquella forma de operar por parte de un usuario (reivindicación del genocidio, ataque a usuarios, etc), como lo especifican nuestros tèrminos de uso, es contrario al acuerdo que él suscribió y por ende, lo hace perder los derechos que de él se desprenden, así como habilita a los podmins a tomar acciones en su contra.
Esto está contemplado en los puntos 4 y 7 de nuestros términos de uso:

"4) (...) En Diaspora* Argentina consideramos al respeto y la camaradería como valores fundamentales a la hora de llevar adelante un debate. Por lo cual no estarán permitidos los usuarios troll, ni las publicaciones o comentarios que apunten a molestar, ofender o difamar a otros usuarios sin ningún tipo de motivo o argumento valedero. Diaspora* Argentina podría no tolerar la publicación de cualquier contenido que viole estos términos y definiciones, por lo cual los podmins tendrán el derecho de eliminar el contenido en cuestión, llamar la atención y/o tomar medidas contra el usuario que lo haya publicado."

"7) Incumplimiento de los Términos. El usuario que violara o incumpliera los Términos de uso, perderá las garantías y derechos que se desprenden de los mismos. Diaspora* Argentina entiende que ese usuario rompe su compromiso de uso del pod, establecido en estos Términos, habilitando a los administradores a tomar medidas de suspensión o eliminación sobre la cuenta del usuario. "

Las personas que reivindican el genocidio, la pedoficia, la trata de personas, la violencia de género, las violaciones, el racismo, etc, son para nosotros criminales que deben ser escrachados y llevados a la justicia. Nosotros no tenemos por qué permitir que ellos utilicen nuestra plataforma para descargar su odio y mucho menos los protegeremos mientras hacen eso. Por el contrario, los escracharemos como lo hicimos. Mal que les pese a estos "Freedom kiddies", las acciones llevadas a cabo por nosotros fueron mínimas en comparación a lo que este tipo de gente se merece.

Pero se malentiende el concepto de libertad. Para estos muchachitos pequebú occidentales y tecnicistas, tomar acciones contra un fascista es ir en contra de la libertad. Menudo concepto de libertad el de tolerar la intolerancia y la violencia política. Algo tán estúpido como decir: "Somos libres, entonces acá todos hacen lo que quieren, entonces admitimos a los que pretenden coartarle la libertad a la sociedad. Cómo se lo vamos a prohibir, si les prohibimos entonces no somos libres". Entonces, bajo este razonamiento, un pod libre es aquel que admite el fascismo, la divulgación de pedofilia, la violencia hacia las mujeres, etc.
Este concepto "liberal" de libertad me recuerda a Richard Stallman diciendo que él no tendría problemas en que un gobierno utilice Software Libre para tirar misiles. Y me recuerda a los partidos fascistas presentándose a elecciones y siendo admitidos como una opción más de la democracia.

A ver, niños amantes de "lo libre". La libertad en la sociedad es un poco más ámplia y compleja que "Free beer" o "Share with friends". Libertad implica responsabilidades a nivel social.

Un derechista nacionalista (un fascista) como el que uds nos señalan no debe ser admitido en un pod si su admin pretende defender la libertad de sus usuarios o la democracia del pod. Libertad no incluye la "libertad de atacar a otros".

Culpa de su "permisividad" Diaspora está llena de pedófilos y fachos. Culpa de esa idea de libertad abstracta y no comprometida con nada, el Software Libre es aprovechado por corporaciones para espiar a los usuarios y cometer atrocidades. Maduren un poco, y no se suban al caballito de "Nosotros defendemos lo libre" si realmente no entienden nada.

Ustedes me recuerdan al gobierno de los Estados Unidos. Si son yanquis puedo comprender ese comportamiento. Tal vez imiten a "sus jefes". Estados Unidos se las da de ser el "Gendarme del mundo" y el "Defensor de los Derechos Humanos y la libertad". Pero ocuren las peores cosas en los países que están bajo su dominio y tildan de "dictadores" a aquellos gobernantes que no siguen su lìnea, que plantean políticas independientes. Ellos invaden y toman injerencia sobre las políticas de los países que tildan de "dictadores y/o terroristas". Todo por intereses propios. Para adueñarse de sus recursos y su territorio. Los atacan, les meten sanciones, los ponen en listas negras como hacen ustedes y luego se meten en su política interna, les dicen lo que tienen que hacer (como implícitamente hacen ustedes también). Si no aceptan tienen que prepararse para la guerra. Menos mal que nosotros somos pods y no países.

Canek, ¿quién te dió el tìtulo de juez e interventor de todos los pods de Diaspora* del mundo?. ¿Qué autoridad moral pensás que tenés para hacerlo? Quién sos vos para decirme a mi cómo debo actuar en la administración de mi pod? ¿Acaso colaboraste en algo?

Alguien en tus comentarios dijo que debíamos hacer un pod de comunistas y meternos todos ahí. Como un gheto. Linda idea tienen ustedes de federación y de intercambio. Se las dan de libres y son de los más censuradores que existen. Te propongo lo contrario. Ya que amás tanto la "libertad de expresión" de los derechosos y fascistas, montate tu propio pod, llenalo de fascistas y pedófilos, y dejame de joder...
Te aseguro que los usuarios de Diaspora a nivel general vamos a estar más felices si los fascistas dejan de molestarnos.

Tu listita negra no tiene ningún efecto en Diaspora, Schindler.

#Libertad #Responsabilidad #ListaNegra #Administracion #Diaspora #Argentina #RedSocial #Politica #Imperialismo #Capitalismo #Fascismo #Comunismo #Internacional

#Free #FreeSpeech #Pub #Public #ThoughtCrime #ThoughtPolice #1984 #MSM #MainstreamMedia #SocialMedia #Minds #Gab #Mastodon #Facebook #Twitter #Google #Gplus #GooglePlus #Establishment #Antifa #Censorship #Globalist #Globalism #ShadowBan #ShadowBanning #ShadowBanned #PoliticalCorrectness #PoliticallyCorrect #PC #NPC #Politics #Pod #Podmin #Admin #CuckPod #CuckPods #iLikeToast #Pluspora #GPlusRefugee #Disroot #ThePirateParty #PirateParty #Gibberfish #DiaspOrg #Diasp-org #Gianforte #JoinDiaspora #Nerdpol #LibreNet #Geraspora #DiasporaArgentina #DiasporaTown #Cryptospora #Framasphere #DiasporaBR #PewPew #NewHere #OldHere #<3 #Diaspora #DiasporaFoundation #Friendica #SocialHome #Network #Fediverse #Federation #Confederation #Nationalist #Rebel #Rebellion #Alliance #RebelAlliance #DiasporaRebellion #DiasporaRebelAlliance #WildDiaspora #Dissidents #Dissident #Freedom #Anarchy #Hashtags
 



#DiasporaRebelAlliance #Update

Don't think this whole thing is just a flash in the pan, because it's not. I can't sustain the blitz of last weekend's rebel postings. That was the summation of a long term plan and a weeks nights on the GIMP doing the #ArtHarder to produce graphics. Even though the frequency of Rebel postings might slow a little, rest assured this alliance is here to stay and will remain a permanent addition to the diaspora* landscape. Slow and steady is the pace.

As expected, the opposition has been relentless but we are thankful for our many supporters, both overt and covert. You know who you are. ;) I appreciate you all, when things seem dark and I start to feel demoralized, you guys lift me up and give me hope. I am eternally grateful for that. The opposition posts reek of desperation, and their talking points are tired and redundant. Our future is looking bright.

In the near future there are more rebel posts planned. I intend to release a bunch of the badges and flags I've made as CC creative commons, so that the d* community can freely use them. Also I am noticing a lot of the same comments and questions are being repeatedly asked, so I plan on putting together a Rebel Alliance FAQ post.

So stay tuned true believers, there is much more to come.

#Thanks #Appreciation #Gratitude #Perseverance #Network #SocialMedia #Federation #Community #GrassRoots #Public #Pub #Freedom #FC #FreedomClub #Motivational #Hope #NeverGiveUp #NoSurrender #qotd #uncleTed #Inspiration #Gunday #SKS
 

Véhicules électriques : Tesla veut conquérir le grand public


Image/photo

#breakingnews #conquérir #électriques #grand #news #public #tesla #veut #véhicules

La marque de la Silicon Valley a réduit le prix de sa Model 3 (35.000 dollars) grâce à plusieurs mesures de réduction des coûts, notamment la fermeture de nombreux magasins.Image/photo
posted by pod_feeder
 

Why Portland's Public Toilets Succeeded Where Others Failed (2012)


The Portland Loo's defense-first design has freed it from becoming a beaten-down haven for illegal activity
Article word count: 1187

HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19269090
Posted by curtis (karma: 22851)
Post stats: Points: 94 - Comments: 101 - 2019-02-28T05:16:17Z

#HackerNews #2012 #failed #others #portlands #public #succeeded #toilets #where #why
Article content:

Image/photo

City of Portland

For the residents of Portland, Ore., taking a whiz in a public toilet is not just a matter of necessity. It’s an act of civic pride.

That’s because the city is home to the [1]Portland Loo, a unique, patented outdoor bathroom that inspires such worship in its fanbase you’d think that Steve Jobs himself had designed it. This adoration comes despite the fact that the 24-hour loo was built to be as inhospitable as possible. This toilet does not want to be loved, but in Portland, it is No. 1 (and, presumably, sometimes No. 2 as well).

"One thing we have ahead of other toilet designs is that we’ve learned people like to do nefarious things"

The soulless receptacle for bodily waste has its own [2]blog, [3]Twitter account and [4]Facebook page. When a loo hater [5]set one ablaze last June, Facebook denizens flocked to its defense. "The Portland Loos rock! What other city can boast public restrooms that are fire proof. ;)" wrote Laura Mears, while Charlie Clint chimed in with, "Iʼm always sending someone to use one of these – and itʼs great to hear how sturdy they are! (woo hoo)."

A Yelp review of a new loo at Jamison Square, titled "Epic win!," is flush with love. "I plan on dropping a mean deuce in that thing ASAP," wrote Andrew C.

On Jan. 31, Portland officials will [6]christen the city’s fifth loo, at NW Couch St. and 8th Ave., with an inaugural flush. With [7]inspirational artwork furnished by students at the nearby Emerson elementary school, it could be the most popular yet. But how did these sleek compartments of metal and plastic, which may smell slightly of urine, become a cult hit among Portland’s bathroom aficionados?

Simple: They’re not as crappy as other citiesʼ toilets.

Take, for instance, San Francisco’s self-cleaning outdoor bathrooms. They’ve been [8]plagued with maintenance problems since they were installed in 1995. Some don’t work and others have odors that are rumored to rival that of a week-dead buffalo.

Then there’s Seattle’s disastrous deployment of automatic lavatories. The city would have been better feeding the $5 million it paid for them down the swirling gullet of a Starbucks commode. The design of the john allowed anybody to lock the door and turn it into their own private fiefdom.

With trash piling up on the floor, the self-cleaning mechanisms became useless. By the end of their run, in 2008, even [9]drug addicts had stopped using Seattle’s toilets. They eventually wound up at bargain-level prices on eBay.

When Portland’s pols decided to try their own sidewalk-restroom experiment, they first surveyed the smoking rubble of the West Coast’s other outhouses and took careful note.

“We really looked at Seattle as what not to do,” says Anna DiBenedetto, a staff assistant to city commissioner Randy Leonard, the [10]spiritual godfather of the Portland Loo. “We think it was the design that was the fatal flaw. Trying to be comfortable and private makes people feel more empowered to do the illegal activities that people do in public toilets.”

So in 2006, Commissioner Leonard convened an ultra-elite Loo Squad, featuring ace toilet designer Curtis Banger, to create the perfect privy of the people. The group worked nonstop – although probably not while on the can, as perfect as that would be – to forge an interior design that would make tinklers want to get out of there as fast as humanly possible.

Two years later, their hard work paid off in the world’s first Portland Loo, located in the Old Town-Chinatown neighborhood. Despite its location right next to a Greyhound Bus Station, it remains standing to this day:

Image via Google Maps

The best way to follow issues you care about.

The toilet’s durability can be chalked up to its defense-first design. "I think one thing we have ahead of other toilet designs is that we’ve learned people like to do nefarious things" to public lavatories, says DiBenedetto. So the Portland Loo includes [11]a variety of bells and whistles meant to keep in check the most degenerate of bathroom users:

• No running water inside: "Some people, if they’re homeless, use a sink to wash their laundry," says DiBenedetto. So there’s no sink, just a spigot on the outside that pours cold water.

• No mirror: People tend to smash mirrors. Perhaps even more frequently if there’s no running water within reach.

• Bars at the top and bottom of the structure: It may make the water closet look like a cage for a gorilla, but these apertures have critical importance. Cops can peep in near the ground to make sure there’s no more than one set of feet inside. The openings also help sound flow freely, letting pedestrians hear the grunts and splashes of the person inside and the person inside hear the footsteps and conversation of pedestrians. Nobody wants to stick around such a toilet for long.

• A graffiti-proof coating: No one will be tagging this latrine.

• Walls and doors made from heavy-gauge stainless steel: “It’s built with the idea that somebody could take a bat to it,” DiBenedetto says. “And if they did damage it, we could replace that part.”

So far, the most popular activity for malcontents is jamming the flush button, perhaps using some sort of special tool.

These PSYOP-worthy features are outlined in [12]U.S. Patent No. D622,408 S, which Leonard received in the summer of 2010. The toilet has the dubious honor of being the city of Portland’s first patent.

For the first loo, the city paid an estimated $140,000. The price of subsequent ones has gone down to about $90,000*, with an annual maintenance fee of $12,000 per commode. Portland recently sold one of its loos to Victoria in British Columbia for just under $100,000. It hopes to vend more when the economy recovers.

The prospect of Portland Loos appearing on street corners all across America is exciting to DiBenedetto, who’s not just a city-paid promoter of the throne, but a happy user, too.

"Whenever I have friends in the car and we pass by one, it’s like, ‘There’s the loo!ʼ" she says. "It’s cold and really strange inside, and there’s a sense of, ʼWow, I’m really close to the sidewalk and people can hear me peeing,ʼ but it’s really cool."

For readers who must know more about this miraculous potty, hereʼs the preliminary patent application:

[13]Portland Loo Patent Application
  • Correction: A city staffer originally gave an incorrect cost of $60,000.
    [14]John Metcalfe

    1. [15]A photo of an abandoned building in Providence, Rhode Island.
    [16]Perspective

    Most serious urban violence is concentrated among less than 1 percent of a city’s population. So why are we still criminalizing whole areas?

    2. [17]
    [IMG][18]Design

    The Portland Looʼs defense-first design has freed it from becoming a beaten-down haven for illegal activity

    3. [19]a rendering of a dog park in Chicagoʼs Lincoln Yards
    [20]Equity

    In Chicago and other cities, the demand for pet-friendly public space has boomed. But many communities see off-leash parks as heralds of gentrification.

    4. [21]A photo of a train stopping in downtown Miami.
    [22]Perspective

    Urban leaders need to kick the incentive habit and take a more inclusive approach to growing local economies.

    5. [23]
    [IMG][24]Equity

    One-fifth of China’s urban housing stock has been bought up and left vacant, and it’s adding to the country’s housing woes.

    [25]
    [IMG][26]
    [IMG][27][IMG]
References

Visible links
1. http://portlandloo.com/
2. http://portlandloo.com/press/in-the-news/
3. http://twitter.com/portlandloo
4. http://www.facebook.com/portlandloo
5. http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=182221298502378&set=a.128998020491373.20106.111103015614207&type=1&ref=nf
6. http://www.portlandmercury.com/portland/in-other-news/Content?oid=5419659
7. http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=280297035361470&set=a.128998020491373.20106.111103015614207&type=1&theater
8. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=%2Fc%2Fa%2F2011%2F12%2F10%2FBAQH1MA4DV.DTL&tsp=1
9. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CHEQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fblogs.seattleweekly.com%2Fdailyweekly%2F2008%2F07%2Fno_toilet_takers.php&ei=B8YZT-WrA4H5ggejqK3vCw&usg=AFQjCNFlC34Zq8sdbhi-oA_6AOT6fXlgwA
10. http://blog.oregonlive.com/portlandcityhall/2011/09/flush_times_for_randy_leonard.html
11. http://portlandloo.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Spec-sheet5.pdf
12. http://www.google.com/patents?id=43LSAAAAEBAJ&zoom=4&pg=PA1#v=onepage&q&f=false
13. http://www.scribd.com/doc/79112691/Portland-Loo-Patent-Application
15. https://www.citylab.com/perspective/2019/02/broken-windows-theory-policing-urban-violence-crime-data/583030/
16. https://www.citylab.com/perspective/
17. https://www.citylab.com/design/2012/01/why-portlands-public-toilets-succeeded-where-others-failed/1020/
18. https://www.citylab.com/design/
19. https://www.citylab.com/equity/2019/02/chicago-dog-park-lincoln-yards-gentrification-racial-divide/581086/
20. https://www.citylab.com/equity/
21. https://www.citylab.com/perspective/2019/02/amazon-hq2-new-york-incentives-economic-development-cities/583540/
22. https://www.citylab.com/perspective/
23. https://www.citylab.com/equity/2019/02/china-vacant-apartments-housing-market-bubble-ghost-cities/583528/
24. https://www.citylab.com/equity/
25. https://www.citylab.com/posts/maps/
26. https://www.citylab.com/newsletters/
27. https://www.facebook.com/thisiscitylab/

HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 96 - Loop: 373 - Rank min: 80 - Author rank: 103
 
 


Don't be afraid to get your hands dirty!

Your freedom requires maintenance!


As a prominent dissident on this network I have long been aware that censorship exists even here in Diaspora. The first time I had an account deleted on me it was on the Cryptospora pod. The podmin did it without any message or warning. Just like that, poof, it was gone. All my data and contacts vanished. All because I was challenging a narrative with a comment he didn't like. Of course I just made a new account, and reconnected with my contacts, but after that I started to keep track of which pods were opposed to people challenging certain narratives. Every time I noticed a fellow dissident having issues with a pod I made a mental note of it. Before long some of them were even messaging me in private, asking me for intel on good pods.

There were also public discussions. Others were offering me information, and in time my list of pods became too big to keep in my head, and I had to start writing them down. The very first version of the Cuck-pod list was published in a private thread to a limited aspect. For the rest of Diaspora this all started with the first public version of my list.

Even before I published the first list, I always acknowledged that pods were private property, and that the podmin could operate them however they please. However that doesn't mean we can't talk about their actions and keep track of how these pods are run. The purpose of this list had always been to share information for the benefit of the community. So that new people as well as established users can make an informed decision on which pods they choose to associate with.

I had not expected the censorship agenda to accelerate so quickly. The first version of the list was just about pods not tolerating controversial users. The second version was necessitated once I'd learned that Brian Ó of Gibberfish was developing a shadow banning toolkit for podmins. Also the Diasp.org pod, (which had previously bragged about having an extremely tolerant policy to free-speech,) took a sudden and regressive turn, In one night they deleted the accounts of three prominent dissidents without warning. Diasp.org also went to the extra effort of deleting every single comment these accounts had ever made, in public threads as well as private. This resulted in thousands of broken conversations in threads all over the network. A sudden departure from the podmin's previous statement of: "I do not remove posts and comments that people do not like, everyone has the right to say what they like here as long as it is within the law."
The CuckPod list was phase 1. Yet I am only one man, trying to keep track of all this, so this is phase 2: The Diaspora Rebel Alliance. My intent here is to spread further awareness of the situation and extend the call to those who're concerned about free-speech and willing to take a stand against the relentless push of censorship. It's time to push back, and we're doing this with information, because knowledge is power. ;)

The Rebel Alliance is not a formal organization. There are no sign up sheets, membership rosters or treasury. It is a crowd sourcing endeavour. Decentralized and free, just like our network was supposed to be. Essentially this is a conversation.

If you would like to join us and take a proactive role in the conversation, we have some achievable short term goals that could be collaborated on.

The list could do with some rebranding. The whole "cuck" meme has gotten kind of stale and carries a right-wing association. The "CuckPod" name was catchy and serves as a good term to shame the censors, so this is how my list of pods became known and gained notoriety. However if someone could come up with a better name to use, I would be open to hearing their suggestions.

Speaking of right-wing association, there was a commenter who, although supportive of the alliance, was concerned that my reputation would be a hindrance. He suggested I should have made a new account to start the Alliance and that doing so would be a good idea. Well to that I say, if not for my experience I would not be here thinking about these issues. Had I stayed to the safe, establishment opinions and never questioned certain narratives, I would not be as motivated to put myself out there like this in defence of free-speech. (One needs not be concerned about thought-police, if one never commits a thought-crime.) -And, had I chosen to disassociate myself with a new account for this initiative, the most vocal core supporters would still be the same, our detractors would have easily guessed who was responsible and would probably have used it to claim I was dishonest or hiding in using the new account. No, I think it is better to remain transparent and be open about who I am, because I am not the one who has something to be ashamed of.

Regardless of my own political inclinations, I have made it clear that the Rebel Alliance is willing to collaborate with all sides of the political spectrum. Certainly, the write up to this list of pods bears a rightist bias. That is only natural because so far most of the censorship has been against right-wing people. If you are interested in this work, but find yourself put off by its bias, I say to you: "put out, or get out!" I have done my part to extend the hand. Some left leaning individuals have expressed interest and been supportive, yet so far most of them are hesitant to associate publicly because they fear backlash from the extremist elements. While this is understandable, at some point people are going to have to get their hands dirty and take a stand before it is too late.

If we don't believe in freedom of speech for people we despise, then we don't believe in it at all.

This issue is bigger than our petty ideological differences and our individual personalities. We are already on the slippery slope. I'm sure my critics would have you believe that once these "far-right" voices are silenced, everything will be fine... and their censorship will end there. Going along with that is beyond naive. Many of these same people who seek to silence "nazis," have also expressed a desire to silence those who question vaccines and the climate change narrative. Some of these censorship lobbyists see the state of Israel as a sacred cow, and would shut down any one criticizing it as an "anti-semite." After that they may go after those talking about GMOs, and don't be surprised when they expand the definition of "far-right" to include anyone who doesn't conform to their politically correct orthodoxy. I have talked to a few G+ Refugees who experienced censorship from Google over posting some pretty benign stuff. Don't think it couldn't happen here, the urge to censorship will never be satisfied. (History backs this up. Just look at Soviet Russia.)

If we just ignore this problem it will only get worse. You might take comfort for now by telling yourself this censorship doesn't effect you. If you just sit on your hands, eventually it will, and by then it will be too late.
Documenting these activities and making the information available is my way of addressing the situation. The majority of people using this network do not have the means to run their own pod, but at least they can have the information to make an informed choice. Since posting the first public version of my pod list I have received tons of criticism. Then after starting The Rebel Alliance initiative that criticism has increased. But the bulk of this criticism has been endless repetitions of the same tired old talking points. Most of which were anticipated and addressed in the preamble of my very first pod list. All I am doing here is keeping track of pod activities and making the information available to the community. If the podmin have the right to do what they want with their pods, then surely we have a right to talk about it. That is what this is after all, a conversation.

Yet whenever certain controversial members of this community do anything, the mentally unstable totalitarians of this network have a conniption and demand censorship. If they do not like what they see, they could always use the ignore function and carry on with their day. But instead they make demands that these offending voices be silenced for everybody else as well. I've seen some of them even use the ignore function to block the offending user, but carry on interacting with the offending content anyway. One is left to assume that the continually offended somehow enjoy their state of perpetual outrage.

If these critics truly see nothing wrong with what is happening, then why would they have a problem with people talking about it? 🤔


Image/photo

#Free #FreeSpeech #Free-Speech #Choice #InformedConsent #Pub #Public #NewHere #OldHere #GplusRefugee #Censorship #ShadowBanning #ThoughtPolice #ThoughtCrime #Antifa #Cuckpod #Diaspora #Community #Conversation #Critics #Network #Fediverse #Federation #Confederation #GrassRoots #Rebel #Rebellion #Alliance #Axis #FC #FreedomClub #RebelAlliance #DiasporaRebellion #DiasporaRebelAlliance #InfoWar #WildDiaspora #Dissidents #Dissident #Politics #Freedom #Anarchy #History
 

Acá tienen a uno que pretende hacer con los pods independientes lo mismo que hace EE.UU. con los países soberanos


Image/photo
https://diaspora.com.ar/posts/2756123

Un tal canek (canek@share.naturalnews.com ) del pod share.naturalnews.com, se las da, al igual que EE.UU, de defensor de la "Libertad de expresión" y para eso no se le ocurre mejor idea que hacer una lista negra de lo que llama "Cuck pods" llamando a no registrarse en ellos. Para eso usa un falso criterio de "libertad de expresión" que básicamente consiste en decir y hacer cualquier cosa mientras los podmins mantienen una postura pasiva y permisiva, limitándose solo a la administración técnica del pod que corren.

Nuestro pod fue incluído en su lista negra con la siguiente leyenda que pasaré a responder a continuación. Otros pods incluídos en la lista son pod.disroot.org, diasp.org, nerdpol.ch, pod.geraspora.de. Muchos de los usuarios bloqueados en esos pods son trolls o fascistas cuyas cuentas fueron borradas.
http://diaspora.com.ar

Another cuck pod. This one acts as a national pod calling itself “Diaspora Argentina” yet deletes the accounts of nationalists and right-wingers without warning and has even been known to make public their personal information. (https://diaspora.com.ar/posts/846253) (https://diasp.org/posts/9153227)
El crimen que cometimos según ellos, ofendiendo su criterio de "libertad", es el de haber "borrado cuentas de nacionalistas derechistas (fascistas) sin aviso y haber hecho pública su información personal". Sin embargo, si bien borramos varias cuentas de fascistas, solo en un caso hicimos público su mail, por el carácter violento y pro-genocida de un usuario que era defensor de la dictadura militar argentina, que actuaba como troll y atacaba las publicaciones de personas y organizaciones que defendìan los Derechos Humanos. De hecho sí fue advertido pero continuó con su hostigamiento, no dándonos más remedio que actuar en su contra.
Estos cabeza hueca-liberales condenan con listas negras a quienes actuamos contra fascistas pero nada dicen de estos fascistas cuando atacan a nuestros usuarios y reivindican el asesinato y desaparición de personas.

Su idea de "libertad" parece no aplicarse cuando se trata de proteger a nuestros usuarios y nuestro pod. Es la idea más tonta de libertad :"Sos libre de publicar lo que quieras". No importa ahí la responsabilidad, ni si atacás a alguien, ni importa tampoco la "libertad" de los administradores de permitir o no conductas destructivas dentro del pod. Somos admins y por eso somos unos forros que no tenemos que existir, que no tenemos que "meter mano". Parece como si tuviéramos que ser castigados por tener servidores, por que no sea todo p2p en Internet. No tiene que importar nuestro criterio porque no deberíamos ni existir. Tenemos que dejar que todo fluya frente a nuestros ojos y que cualquiera haga lo que quiera mientras nosotros ponemos la infraestructura, el trabajo, pagamos la luz y mantenemos el server. Y mientras muchos usuarios descansan cómodamente sobre nuestro trabajo para después criticarnos, cuando podrían ellos mismos abrirse su propio pod.

Es que, como dice este tal Canek, "Nosotros nos llamamos a nosotros mismos Diaspora* Argentina". Claro. No es porque seamos el único pod del país, ni el primero. Es porque le robamos a los 40 millones de habitantes la posibilidad de abrirse su propio pod. Hasta el nombre nos critican...
Estoy seguro que a los pods que están llenos de pornografía y pedofilia no los critican ¡No vi ninguno en esa lista! y miren que está lleno de pods así en Diaspora. Esos no son "Cuck pods"...

Entonces, según la idea de estos personajes, si actuamos contra un defensor del genocidio, dejamos de ser un pod libre. ¡Qué idea lineal y estúpida de entender la libertad!
Sin embargo, como en todo grupo social, tenemos nuestras condiciones y "acuerdos de convivencia", no compatibles con lo que hizo aquel sujeto en nuestro pod. Aquella forma de operar por parte de un usuario (reivindicación del genocidio, ataque a usuarios, etc), como lo especifican nuestros tèrminos de uso, es contrario al acuerdo que él suscribió y por ende, lo hace perder los derechos que de él se desprenden, así como habilita a los podmins a tomar acciones en su contra.
Esto está contemplado en los puntos 4 y 7 de nuestros términos de uso:

"4) (...) En Diaspora* Argentina consideramos al respeto y la camaradería como valores fundamentales a la hora de llevar adelante un debate. Por lo cual no estarán permitidos los usuarios troll, ni las publicaciones o comentarios que apunten a molestar, ofender o difamar a otros usuarios sin ningún tipo de motivo o argumento valedero. Diaspora* Argentina podría no tolerar la publicación de cualquier contenido que viole estos términos y definiciones, por lo cual los podmins tendrán el derecho de eliminar el contenido en cuestión, llamar la atención y/o tomar medidas contra el usuario que lo haya publicado."

"7) Incumplimiento de los Términos. El usuario que violara o incumpliera los Términos de uso, perderá las garantías y derechos que se desprenden de los mismos. Diaspora* Argentina entiende que ese usuario rompe su compromiso de uso del pod, establecido en estos Términos, habilitando a los administradores a tomar medidas de suspensión o eliminación sobre la cuenta del usuario. "

Las personas que reivindican el genocidio, la pedoficia, la trata de personas, la violencia de género, las violaciones, el racismo, etc, son para nosotros criminales que deben ser escrachados y llevados a la justicia. Nosotros no tenemos por qué permitir que ellos utilicen nuestra plataforma para descargar su odio y mucho menos los protegeremos mientras hacen eso. Por el contrario, los escracharemos como lo hicimos. Mal que les pese a estos "Freedom kiddies", las acciones llevadas a cabo por nosotros fueron mínimas en comparación a lo que este tipo de gente se merece.

Pero se malentiende el concepto de libertad. Para estos muchachitos pequebú occidentales y tecnicistas, tomar acciones contra un fascista es ir en contra de la libertad. Menudo concepto de libertad el de tolerar la intolerancia y la violencia política. Algo tán estúpido como decir: "Somos libres, entonces acá todos hacen lo que quieren, entonces admitimos a los que pretenden coartarle la libertad a la sociedad. Cómo se lo vamos a prohibir, si les prohibimos entonces no somos libres". Entonces, bajo este razonamiento, un pod libre es aquel que admite el fascismo, la divulgación de pedofilia, la violencia hacia las mujeres, etc.
Este concepto "liberal" de libertad me recuerda a Richard Stallman diciendo que él no tendría problemas en que un gobierno utilice Software Libre para tirar misiles. Y me recuerda a los partidos fascistas presentándose a elecciones y siendo admitidos como una opción más de la democracia.

A ver, niños amantes de "lo libre". La libertad en la sociedad es un poco más ámplia y compleja que "Free beer" o "Share with friends". Libertad implica responsabilidades a nivel social.

Un derechista nacionalista (un fascista) como el que uds nos señalan no debe ser admitido en un pod si su admin pretende defender la libertad de sus usuarios o la democracia del pod. Libertad no incluye la "libertad de atacar a otros".

Culpa de su "permisividad" Diaspora está llena de pedófilos y fachos. Culpa de esa idea de libertad abstracta y no comprometida con nada, el Software Libre es aprovechado por corporaciones para espiar a los usuarios y cometer atrocidades. Maduren un poco, y no se suban al caballito de "Nosotros defendemos lo libre" si realmente no entienden nada.

Ustedes me recuerdan al gobierno de los Estados Unidos. Si son yanquis puedo comprender ese comportamiento. Tal vez imiten a "sus jefes". Estados Unidos se las da de ser el "Gendarme del mundo" y el "Defensor de los Derechos Humanos y la libertad". Pero ocuren las peores cosas en los países que están bajo su dominio y tildan de "dictadores" a aquellos gobernantes que no siguen su lìnea, que plantean políticas independientes. Ellos invaden y toman injerencia sobre las políticas de los países que tildan de "dictadores y/o terroristas". Todo por intereses propios. Para adueñarse de sus recursos y su territorio. Los atacan, les meten sanciones, los ponen en listas negras como hacen ustedes y luego se meten en su política interna, les dicen lo que tienen que hacer (como implícitamente hacen ustedes también). Si no aceptan tienen que prepararse para la guerra. Menos mal que nosotros somos pods y no países.

Canek, ¿quién te dió el tìtulo de juez e interventor de todos los pods de Diaspora* del mundo?. ¿Qué autoridad moral pensás que tenés para hacerlo? Quién sos vos para decirme a mi cómo debo actuar en la administración de mi pod? ¿Acaso colaboraste en algo?

Alguien en tus comentarios dijo que debíamos hacer un pod de comunistas y meternos todos ahí. Como un gheto. Linda idea tienen ustedes de federación y de intercambio. Se las dan de libres y son de los más censuradores que existen. Te propongo lo contrario. Ya que amás tanto la "libertad de expresión" de los derechosos y fascistas, montate tu propio pod, llenalo de fascistas y pedófilos, y dejame de joder...
Te aseguro que los usuarios de Diaspora a nivel general vamos a estar más felices si los fascistas dejan de molestarnos.

Tu listita negra no tiene ningún efecto en Diaspora, Schindler.

#Libertad #Responsabilidad #ListaNegra #Administracion #Diaspora #Argentina #RedSocial #Politica #Imperialismo #Capitalismo #Fascismo #Comunismo #Internacional

#Free #FreeSpeech #Pub #Public #ThoughtCrime #ThoughtPolice #1984 #MSM #MainstreamMedia #SocialMedia #Minds #Gab #Mastodon #Facebook #Twitter #Google #Gplus #GooglePlus #Establishment #Antifa #Censorship #Globalist #Globalism #ShadowBan #ShadowBanning #ShadowBanned #PoliticalCorrectness #PoliticallyCorrect #PC #NPC #Politics #Pod #Podmin #Admin #CuckPod #CuckPods #iLikeToast #Pluspora #GPlusRefugee #Disroot #ThePirateParty #PirateParty #Gibberfish #DiaspOrg #Diasp-org #Gianforte #JoinDiaspora #Nerdpol #LibreNet #Geraspora #DiasporaArgentina #DiasporaTown #Cryptospora #Framasphere #DiasporaBR #PewPew #NewHere #OldHere #<3 #Diaspora #DiasporaFoundation #Friendica #SocialHome #Network #Fediverse #Federation #Confederation #Nationalist #Rebel #Rebellion #Alliance #RebelAlliance #DiasporaRebellion #DiasporaRebelAlliance #WildDiaspora #Dissidents #Dissident #Freedom #Anarchy #Hashtags
 

The Sound of My Own Voice


source: https://thepointmag.com/2019/politics/the-sound-of-my-own-voice
If many #online bigots and loudmouths turn out to be perfectly pleasant in person, we can hardly be surprised then—just as there are plenty of nice dogs who bark viciously from behind a fence, and plenty of nice people who are transformed into irate bullies when they find themselves behind the wheel of a car.
#internet #filterbubble #privacy #politics #public #freedom #technology #future #society
The Sound of My Own Voice
 

The class does not have a descriptor, or a descriptor that does not use inheritance or uses a ClassExtractor for inheritance

The mentioned message still comes when you have @Inheritance (strategy = InheritanceType.TABLE_PER_CLASS) in your abstract (not-persisted) with latest version of #Payara / #Glassfish which both contains #EclipseLink by default.

Strange that they did not yet fix it. And unfortunally migrating to e.g. #WilfFly (which uses other #JPA) seems not so easy as you may think.

Currently I have no idea how to fix it and sadly I need the strategy as this #JavaEE application is written for an existing database layout.

Someone may have to raise a support ticket mentioning that the #bug is still there.

Reposted with #public visibility. Sorry for double message.
 
Later posts Earlier posts